GLPA Conference Proceedings: 2018

GLPA Members:  You can download these Proceedings using the following link. Note that you must be logged in to download the PDF file.
 
 
2018 Proceedings PDF:
 
 
Non-members:  You can order a PDF of this Proceeding ($3) or the entire Proceedings CD ($4) through the online store.
 
 
Here are the titles and abstracts for the Invited Speakers, Contributed Papers, Posters, and Workshops offered during the 2018 GLPA Conference:
 
 
 
Invited Speakers:
 
 
LIVING AMONG THE STARS
2018 Armand Spitz Lecture
David Batch
1717 Ann St.
East Lansing, Michigan 48823
dbatch@msu.edu
 
Abstract: Armand Spitz is introduced through several of his quotes.  Natural interpretation as the National Park Service defines it is described, with parallels drawn to planetarium presentations. Diversity is discussed using research on the notions of “white privilege” and “unconscious bias.” The importance of random events in a person’s life is explored. Prof. Steven Pinker’s reliance on data to offer an optimistic view of the world is noted, with webpage references provided. A strategy planetarians might consider to help ease the public’s distrust of science is offered. The importance of people feeling a part of the universe at large is declared.
 
 
VIRTUAL TOUR OF THE NATIONAL SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON LABORATORY
Zachary Constan
National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory
and Facility for Rare Isotope Beams
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan
Constan@nscl.msu.edu
 
Abstract: The "Virtual Tour" of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory includes fulldome images of the experimental vaults, 3D models of equipment, and animations that demonstrate how our research gets done. Using MSU's Abrams Planetarium, we can "go" places in the lab that most visitors never see! The tour will be conducted by NSCL outreach coordinator Zach Constan and introduced by Professor Jaideep Singh, whose career grant from the National Science Foundation funded the creation and implementation of this project.
 
 
FUTURE OF PLANETARIUMS: PEOPLE MATTER
Jessica Garcia
Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
jcgarcia@msu.edu
 
Shannon Schmoll
Director of Abrams Planetarium
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
schmoll@pa.msu.edu
 
Abstract: Planetariums are places of joy and excitement to spread love and connection with the night sky for everyone. For us to stay relevant and thrive, we need to appeal to a wide range of people and actively talk about how we work to include everyone in our audiences and as practitioners in our field. Led by Dr. Garcia, this interactive at GLPA 2018 session explored the universal phenomenon of implicit bias: what it is, why and how it happens, and when it is most likely to occur. Participants also explored their own implicit bias and how it impacts the ways in which they interact with audiences and peers and considered some of the ways to reduce the incidence of bias, both professionally and personally, within the Planetarium field.​
 
 
2018 ASTRONOMY UPDATE FOR THE PLANETARIAN
Ronald Kaitchuck
The Charles W. Brown Planetarium
Ball State University
2000 W. Riverside Ave
Muncie, Indiana 47306
rkaitchu@bsu.edu
 
Abstract: Once again, the rate of scientific discoveries has made it impossible to review even a fraction of them. So, there was a lot of selectivity involved in this Astronomy Update. Last July we witnessed a solar system fly-through of an interstellar asteroid (or was it a comet?). The Japanese space agency put three robotic landers on an asteroid. Jupiter has 10 newly discovered moons, brining the total to 79. Its magnetic field has been traced with puzzling results. An underground Martian lake of liquid water has been detected. Mars also has exposed water ice in rock outcrops. The Curiosity rover has found complex organic molecules in the rocks of Gale Crater. The Opportunity rover has been silent since June when a planet-wide dust storm made its solar panels ineffective. Water ice has been found on the Moon in the shadow of craters near the poles. This is not new, but it now appears that the ice may be exposed on, or very near, the surface. The composition of the geyser material that is ejected by Saturn’s moon Enceladus contains very large organic molecules. This indicates the possibility of microbial life beneath the moon’s ice crust. The strange hexagonal pattern in the north polar region of Saturn extends hundreds of miles above the cloud tops. A new small object has been seen in the outer solar system. Its orbit is consistent with the existence of an unseen ninth planet. The studies of exoplanets are finding strange possibilities including Earth-sized planets with surfaces entirely covered with water, rogue planets that float through space without a host star, a planet so hot it has atoms of iron and titanium floating in its atmosphere, images of a forming planet and the possible detection of the first exomoon. The Gaia space probe indicates that the colorful star pair called Albireo is not really a binary system. There will be no explosion from merging stars in the year 2022 after all — it was all just a typo. There were several examples of stars exploding in ways that do not match our ideas about the workings of supernovae. Astronomers may have witnessed the formation of jets coming from a super-massive black hole. We began a new age of multi-messenger astronomy where observations made in the electromagnetic spectrum are combined with those of gravitational waves or streams of subatomic particles.  General Relativity’s prediction of gravitational redshifts was tested using the massive black hole at the Milky Way’s center. Finally, deep space observations reveal baffling behaviors when the universe was young. Chief among these is the great speed with which stars, galaxies, and supermassive black holes formed.
 
 
Contributed Papers:
 
 
DARK TWIST ON PLANETARIUM STORYTELLING
Susan Batson
Big Little Planetarium
15882 Bailey Road
Pleasantville, Pennsylvania 15341
SBatson.GLPA@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Sometimes technology challenges planetarians -- hardware and software sometimes fail. We are in an awkward position -- we have no stars! But, we are anxious to teach students. We have a program set up with the elementary school’s technology specialist, putting third graders into groups, and having them build constellation projectors from oatmeal boxes. We will include some of the dimmer stars in the constellation diagrams we will provide to them; they are not likely to recognize the constellations. Students will write a story, tell it in the planetarium dome, and then listen to several stories about the constellation.
 
 
PROCESSING AND STORYTELLING WITH GAIA DR2 DATA
Milan C. Bhatt
Daniel R. Tell
Morrison Planetarium
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive
San Francisco, California 94118
dtell@calacademy.org
 
Abstract: This year saw the Gaia team release their Data Release 2 from the Gaia satellite, one of the largest stellar databases ever seen.  One of the largest but most interesting challenges in recent years, we were eager to tackle the dataset at Morrison Planetarium. Here's a review of the processes and work we did to get Gaia's data into our software, presentations and lessons we've already used it for, and what we hope to use it for in the future.
 
 
QUALITY CONTROL IN ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS
Jeanne E. Bishop
Westlake Schools Planetarium
24525 Hilliard Road
Westlake, Ohio 44145
jeanneebishop@wowway.com
 
Abstract: When we design an astronomy activity or a planetarium program, there are many factors that need to be considered. One critically important area of concern is quality control. Quality control includes accuracy, respect for all persons, appropriate levels of explanations and humor, attention to whether the material is dated, appropriate level of complication, and clean and nonviolent humor. An activity or planetarium presentation may be interactive or not, but I believe that quality implies that there is a goal of stimulating reflecting thinking. This paper covers these different aspects of quality control.
 
 
DEALING WITH DARK DOME DISCIPLINE
Robert Bonadurer
Daniel M. Soref Planetarium
Milwaukee Public Museum
800 West Wells Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233
bonadurer@mpm.edu
 
Abstract: Every planetarium educator tries to maintain some semblance of “law and order” under their dome. This paper will look at some recent initiatives here in Milwaukee to combat smart phone use, talking, clueless parents (when child crying), and flashing shoes.
 
 
A TALE OF TWO
Christopher Breedlove
Michigan State University
414 Southlawn Ave.
East Lansing, Michigan 48823
kitblove@msu.edu
 
Abstract: I will be presenting a sample from an interactive show currently in production that is like a Choose Your Own Adventure for stardomes. My colleague John French and I hope to offer this show to other planetariums.
 
 
MEET A SLOTH: LIVE ANIMALS IN THE DOME
Joe Childers
Boonshoft Museum of Discovery
2600 DeWeese Pkwy
Dayton, Ohio 45414
jchilders@boonshoftmuseum.org
 
Abstract: The Boonshoft Astronomy and Live Animals departments collaborate to present "Meet a Sloth" shows in our planetarium. You too can meet "Patience" the Linne's Two-Toed Sloth and her sweet potato dealer, Boonshoft's Curator of Live Animals Stephanie Hylinski, via the wonders of video recording. Stephanie and I will discuss the hopes and concerns we each had as we began this program, and relate how over the past year these sloth shows have become both more successful and much easier than we expected.
 
 
ADAPTING GIT TO THE PLANETARIUM WORKFLOW
Steve Crawford
Kalamazoo Valley Museum
230 N Rose St
Kalamazoo, Michigan 49006
scrawford@kvcc.edu
 
Abstract: In any planetarium where scripts are being edited by multiple people, often at multiple workstations, managing these changes can be difficult. Version control software can make this process considerably more failure-resistant. The most widely-adopted version control software, Git, can be successfully adapted into a Digistar 6 workflow. Though Git provides the planetarian with many benefits, including the opportunity to merge multiple versions of a file and the ability to roll back to a previous version of a project, it also comes with some obstacles, including compatibility with Digistar files and technical requirements.
 
 
ENCOURAGING INDIGENOUS VOICES
Jean Creighton
Manfred Olson Planetarium
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM)
UWM Physics, P.O. Box 413
Milwaukee Wisconsin 53201-0413
jcreight@uwm.edu
 
Abstract: I will discuss lessons learned from a fruitful collaboration between the staff at the Manfred Olson Planetarium and the members of the Electra Quinney Institute for American Indian Education, both at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Our work together resulted in a planetarium program that highlighted the culture, language, and sky-Earth connections for six Nations in Wisconsin. These types of collaborations are important because some of these cultures are at the brink of extinction if we don't encourage revitalization. I will give you specific suggestions that will help you build such a collaboration in your community.
 
 
TEACHING VIDEO GAME DESIGN USING SCRATCH
Jack Daleske
Peoria Riverfront Museum
222 SW Washington St.
Peoria, Illinois 61602
jdaleske@peoriariverfrontmuseum.org
 
Abstract: Scratch is a free, web-based design software that is ideal for teaching computer programming in an informal education setting. While designed to be a learning tool for students aged 8 to 16, Scratch is a powerful tool that can be quickly learned by anyone without a computer science background.
 
 
A METHOD TO MODEL SMALL 3D ROCKY BODIES IN 3DS MAX
Jon Dansie
Clark Planetarium
110 S. 400 West
Salt Lake City, Utah 84101
jdansie@slco.org
 
Abstract: When high-res photos of small rocky bodies become available from NASA or other sources, to use them in a 3D animation or show, it doesn't suffice to cut and paste on a flat plane. Mapping onto a sphere works, but lack of height detail is apparent to camera parallax.  Bump map surface normals give apparent surface depth for facing portions, but do not alter the underlying geometry, so the smooth surface is obvious when edge normals are perpendicular to camera views. Spherical height maps displace geometry, but new height maps are low-res or nonexistent. This method is to model height.
 
 
REACHING BEYOND THE DOME
CONNECTING WITH THE COMMUNITY
Michael (Nick) De Luca
Ashley Lemasters
Howard Hale
Ward Beecher Planetarium
Youngstown State University
1 University Plaza
Youngstown, Ohio 44555
mddeluca@student.ysu.edu
ahlemasters@student.ysu.edu
hthale@student.ysu.edu
 
Abstract: Outreach to a community can be accomplished through countless mediums and depends on many variables. Self-promotion is a basic necessity to draw a crowd; however, it cannot sustain audience attention by itself. In this paper, we aim to provide examples of public outreach strategies that have succeeded for our planetarium in recent years to regain record attendance.
 
 
CORE CRITICAL IMPACT INDICATORS: EVALUATION ACROSS AN INSTITUTION
Paulette Epstein
Michigan Science Center
5020 John R St,
Detroit, Michigan 48202
Paulette.epstein@mi-sci.org
 
Abstract: The Michigan Science Center, with generous funding from Denso, is working to evaluate our programming and exhibits across the institution. We are looking to gather input from other informal, hands-on STEM professionals as we review out current impact data and identify our Core Critical Impact Indicators or CCIIs. These CCIIs will help us better track our impact and engagement across the institution. This paper outlines the process that we have gone through so far, and our next steps as we progress in developing our Core Critical Impact Indicators.
 
 
RED PLANET PIONEERS: A MISSION TO MARS
Paulette Epstein
Michigan Science Center
5020 John R St,
Detroit, Michigan 48202
Paulette.epstein@mi-sci.org
 
Abstract: In 2017, the Michigan Science Center was awarded a grant from the Michigan Space Grant Consortium. With this grant, the Michigan Science Center was able to develop and implement a Mars themed after school program for 3rd through 5th graders called the Red Planet Pioneers. The program focused on how we might get to the red planet Mars. This paper discusses the full scope of the project, including what went well, what we would have changed, and the full lesson plans implemented.
 
 
SHADOW PUPPETS ON THE DOME
John S. French
Abrams Planetarium
755 Science Road
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
frenchj@msu.edu
 
Abstract: This paper talks about a shadow puppet show presented in the planetarium by MSU professors Pia Banzhaf and Steve Baibak. The show was an adaptation of the book The Three Astronauts by Umberto Eco.
 
 
NOTRE CIEL: BRINGING FRENCH LANGUAGE IMMERSION TO AN AMERICAN PLANETARIUM
Anna Green
James S. McDonnell Planetarium
Saint Louis Science Center
Saint Louis, Missouri
Anna.Green@slsc.org
 
Abstract: In the spring of 2017, the James S. McDonnell Planetarium at the Saint Louis Science Center presented its first live, interactive planetarium show in French, Notre Ciel. Tying other academic subjects and real-life experiences into learning a world language is important for relevancy and vocabulary growth. As informal education settings, planetariums have a unique opportunity to reach students in ways that standard pedagogical methods may not. Notre Ciel has allowed the McDonnell Planetarium to reach out to a whole new audience: students learning French. This paper seeks to highlight best practices in bringing a world language under the dome.
 
 
MAINTAINING RELEVANCE
Nick Hoffmann
Clark Planetarium
110 S 400 W
Salt Lake City, Utah 84101
nhoffmann@slco.org
 
Abstract: Science centers in general, and Clark Planetarium specifically, have suffered from decreased attendance in recent years. We all face the challenge of remaining relevant to our visitors and constituencies — but how? Clark Planetarium underwent a series of internal and external evaluations to assess its brand, reputation, and relevance within its market area and demographics. Following the evaluation, a series of initiatives have aimed to increase brand awareness, relevance, and program attendance. This presentation will include a discussion of these issues and Clark’s initiatives in response, with the intent that other institutions learn from our example.
 
 
PLANETARIUM CONTENT: DOME OPTIONAL
Mary Holt
Morrison Planetarium
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, Calaifornia 94118
mholt@calacademy.org
 
Abstract: The Morrison Planetarium presenter team has had the opportunity to present and refine a variety of live and pre-rendered content both in the dome and throughout the California Academy of Sciences. Presentations have been given in the 3D theater, a panoramic planetarium, out on the public floor, and more. In this paper I will give an overview of these venues and share how we adapt our planetarium presentations for a variety of audiences and spaces outside the dome.
 
 
CONCERTS UNDER THE STARS: YEAR TWO
Emily Hromi
Grand Rapids Public Museum
272 Pearl Street NW
Grand Rapids, Michigan 49504
ehromi@grpm.org
 
Abstract: Following a successful pilot run in 2017, Concerts Under the Stars continued in 2018 at the Grand Rapids Public Museum’s Roger B. Chaffee Planetarium for an equally successful second season. This paper will discuss the changes that took place between the first and second year, improvements to the series as a whole, reception and outcomes of the 2018 concert season, and plans for 2019.
 
 
UNDERSTANDING SMALL WORLDS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM
David W. Hurd
Haptically Speaking
Edinboro, Pennsylvania 16412
dhurd@edinboro.edu
 
Kenneth P. Quinn
Tactile Graphics Evaluator
Haptically Speaking
234 East 29th Street
Erie, Pennsylvania 16504
cj3639@gmail.com
 
Abstract: NASA has provided the support to produce yet another tactile book highlighting the solar system. In this paper, we will review the content and features of this unique book that is tailored for stuents with and without visual impairments.
 
 
THE MAN WHO PAINTED THE UNIVERSE
Francine Jackson
URI Planetarium
P. O. Box 353
University of Rhode Island
Providence, Rhode Island 02901
francine_jackson@brown.edu
 
Abstract: Whenever we do any type of program, we always hope someone in the audience will take our words to heart. Frank Kovac, after visiting the Adler Planetarium as a child, did much more than most: he built his own planetarium in his backyard.
 
 
STARSHIP BRIDGE SIMULATOR IN YOUR DOME- THE NEXT GENERATION
Chris Janssen
Planetarium of the Wausau School District
Wausau West High School
1200 West Wausau Avenue
Wausau, Wisconsin 54401
cjanssen@wausauschools.org
 
Abstract: You may remember a previous paper/workshop on Artemis, a software that recreates a futuristic starship bridge simulation. Planetariums have used this software for team building activities where groups work together controlling a ship to achieve missions. There's a new software title that has developed quickly in view of many un-addressed bugs and the closed source nature of Artemis software. Empty Epsilon is open source, completely free, highly modifiable, and in many ways superior to Artemis. I'll cover the basics of Empty Epsilon gaming and the differences/benefits relative to Artemis.
 
 
WIN-WIN: PARTNERING WITH LOCAL INTERACTIVE MEDIA STUDENTS
Renae Kerrigan
Peoria Riverfront Museum
222 SW Washington St
Peoria, Illinois 61602
rkerrigan@peoriariverfrontmuseum.org
 
Abstract: The Peoria Riverfront Museum has partnered with our local university’s Interactive Media department for the past five years to provide programming for our visitors. Students in the department create interactive games, short films, VR and IR experiences, and content for our planetarium. The projects are shown off at a free admission community day. This event provides programming that we are not able to create ourselves, gives the students valuable experience, and has strengthened the partnership between our two institutions. Learn how we got started, how the program has grown, and how you might be able to replicate this program in a way that works in your community.   
 
 
SKYSHOW SUMMER CAMPS
Nick Lake
Sarah Smail
Mark SubbaRao
Adler Planetarium
1300 S Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60605
nlake@adlerplanetarium.org
ssmail@adlerplanetarium.org
msubbarao@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: For the past two years, Adler Planetarium has run a week-long skyshow camp for 6th and 7th graders. This camp engages students in the entire process of creating and presenting their own planetarium shows. The campers arrive on Monday with no planetarium experience and on Friday are presenting 5-minute shows of their own creation for their friends and family in the dome. We believe our model is successful and easily adaptable for other institutions.
 
 
THE DOMES OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA
Gary Lazich
299 Sheppard Branch Dr.
Weaverville, North Carolina 28787-8529
glazich@charter.net
 
Abstract: Madison County, Iowa, has its bridges, but western North Carolina has mountains, waterfalls ... and domes! For the past two years, I have been volunteering at Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) in Rosman and Asheville Museum of Science (AMOS) in Asheville. At PARI, I present live programs within their “AdventureDome”; at AMOS, I present “Star Stories” within their StarDome. Each institution has undergone transformation over the past two years as has Mayland Community College, which hopes to build a new permanent dome at their Earth and Sky Park in Burnsville. This paper will describe planetarium activity and prospects at each site.
 
 
TURNING DOME MASTER FRAMES INTO A FULLDOME MOVIE USING BLENDER
Ken Murphy
Southwest Minnesota State University
1501 State St.
Marshall, Minnesota  56258
ken.murphy@smsu.edu
 
Abstract: Blender has a powerful feature-rich built-in video editor that can handle a wide variety of formats, codecs, and frame types. Blender can even replace much if not all of your software production tools at a cost of nothing since it is free and open-source, easily downloaded and installed from blender.org. This talk will be entirely devoted to the powerful video mixer and how to take image frames and turn them into movies as well as demonstrate how to edit your movie, create transitions, and even adjust color, brightness, and contrast.  How to truncate the final movie will also be covered.
 
 
USING THE GIANT PROTRACTOR TO UNDERSTAND THE SEASONS
Mark Percy
Williamsville Space Lab Planetarium
1595 Hopkins Road
Williamsville, New York 14221
mpercy@williamsvillek12.org
 
Abstract: We use the planetarium to teach students that the two key factors responsible for our Earthly seasons are the duration and the angle of insolation. Our full dome video system is capable of demonstrating the Sun’s daily path including a history trail for each of the solstices and equinoxes. However, students struggle with understanding what the Sun’s altitude has to do with the intensity. Our newly invented giant protractor offers a very effective method to help kids understand how the Sun’s angle affects the intensity of the energy that reaches the ground.
 
 
THE 2018 PERIHELIC OPPOSITION OF MARS - A SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE VIEW
Martin Ratcliffe
Sky-Skan, Inc.
c/o 946 Parkway Drive
Valley Center, Kansas 67147
ratcliffe@skyskan.com
 
Abstract: There's a fascinating history of Mars observations from South Africa. The first color image of Mars was taken from what is now a major South African planetarium dome, the Lamont-Hussey Observatory on Naval Hill in Bloemfontein. Furthermore, the nearby Boyden Observatory houses a famous 13" Clark refractor used by William Pickering, and took the first black and white photographs of Mars in 1896. In this paper I visit this telescope for an historical tour of Boyden Observatory, its illustrious history, and report modern observations of Mars acquired by the author through this wonderful telescope.
 
 
PURSUIT OF A BETTER MOUSE TRAP:
CONSTRUCTING AN EFFECTIVE ANALOG MONITOR FILTER FOR OUR PLANETARIUM CONSOLE
Mark S. Reed
Kalamazoo Valley Museum Planetarium
230 North Rose Street
PO Box 4070
Kalamazoo, Michigan 49003-4070
marksreed@aol.com
mreed@kvcc.edu
 
Abstract: Since the early days of using a computer in a planetarium, people have employed a variety of methods to mitigate the amount of light spill around their consoles and domes. Within this paper, I will share my plans of how to construct an effective analog filter that is 1) Easy to make. 2) Can be easily added or removed and 3) Enables presenters to see a rich palette of colors on any monitor.
 
 
KEPLER'S THIRD LAW WITH SCIDOME
Dale W. Smith
BGSU Planetarium
Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio 43404
dwsmith@bgsu.edu
 
Abstract: This planetarium exercise demonstrates Kepler’s Third Law. The ecliptic serves as a calendar and protractor to measure dates of conjunction and quadrature and angles of maximum elongation. From these data, students compute orbital radii and sidereal periods. The exercise includes both inferior and superior planets. This exercise was originally developed using our Minolta opto-mechanical projector and is now adapted to our SciDome full-dome system.
 
 
A STUDY ON VULNERABILITY, POWER, AND CONNECTION IN THE PLANETARIUM
Dayna Thompson
Charles W. Brown Planetarium
Ball State University
Muncie, Indiana 47306 USA
dlthompson3@bsu.edu
 
Abstract: In June 2018, I asked planetarians from the “Dome-L” Google Group and “The Dome Dialogues” Facebook Group to complete an anonymous, open-response survey. The survey included only three questions: “What makes you feel vulnerable when presenting to planetarium guests,” “What makes you feel powerful when presenting to planetarium guests,” and “In what ways do you feel connected with your audience?” The results were published in the September 2018 issue of Planetarian (Vol. 47, No. 3). In this paper I will summarize the results of the survey and discuss how they can open our eyes to personal struggle, responsibility, courage, and permissions.
 
 
JUPITER-SATURN 12-21-2020: T MINUS TWO YEARS AND COUNTING…START WATCHING NOW!
Robert C. Victor
Abrams Planetarium
Michigan State University
755 Science Road
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
victor@msu.edu
 
Abstract: Using Digistar 6, we will follow Jupiter and Saturn at dawn and dusk in 2019-2020, and preview the beautiful planetary conjunctions leading up to December 21, 2020, the closest pairing of these two giant planets between 1623 and 2080. Among the most impressive groupings with Jupiter-Saturn will include Venus at dawn in Jan.-Feb. 2019, Venus at dusk in Nov.-Dec. 2019, and Mars at dawn in March 2020.
 
 
Posters:
 
 
SOLAR MOTION DEMONSTRATOR
Susan Reynolds Button
Quarks to Clusters
8793 Horseshoe Lane
Chittenango, New York 13037
sbuttonq2c@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Learn to build and use a simple device called a “Solar Motion Demonstrator.” This device accurately models the apparent motion of the Sun (rising and setting points as well as the altitude of the Sun at noon) at any time of the year and any latitude in the northern hemisphere of Earth.
 
 
CREATE 360 CONTENT USING GOOGLE STREET VIEW
Sydnee Hamrick
Region 8 Education Service Center of Northeast Indiana
1027 West Rudisill Boulevard
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46807
sydnee.hamrick@gmail.com
 
Abstract: This poster describes the process I found for extracting 360 Google Street View images and getting them onto the planetarium dome. Tips on how to take the best 360 photographs with your smartphone using the Google Street View app will also be shared.
 
 
SKYLORE - ORION IN FULLDOME, FREE!
Mark Percy
Williamsville Space Lab Planetarium
1595 Hopkins Road
Williamsville, New York 14221
mpercy@williamsvillek12.org
 
Abstract: The Williamsville Space Lab Planetarium has made done adaptations for Dayle Brown’s first book, Skylore from Planet Earth: Orion. The multicultural nature of the stories fits perfectly with our elementary school curriculum. We turned her book into a planetarium show and we’re happy to share it with you. Dayle Brown generously offered us the use of her illustrations. A kindergarten teacher named Paul McGirr provided our narration. The Williamsville North High School students did all the rest: audio design and mixing, image editing and scripting in Sky-Skan’s Digital Sky software. We hope you find it useful and enjoyable.
 
 
IPS 2022 BIDS
Mike Smail
Adler Planetarium
1300 S Lake Shore Dr.
Chicago, Illinois 60605
msmail@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: Two global cities have submitted bids to host the 2022 International Planetarium Society (IPS) conference: Houston, USA, and Saint Petersburg, Russia. GLPA's IPS Representative, Mike Smail, will cast a single vote for one of these locations on behalf of GLPA at the IPS Council meeting in June, 2019. Learn more about content, costs, planned activities, and community concerns for each conference site, and submit your vote for which location you think GLPA should support.
 
 
IPS OFFICER ELECTIONS
Mike Smail
Adler Planetarium
1300 S Lake Shore Dr.
Chicago, Illinois 60605
msmail@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: This fall, International Planetarium Society (IPS) members will vote on a full slate of organization officers: President-Elect, Secretary, and Treasurer/Membership Chair. Read position statements from prospective candidates, and maybe even talk to some of them first-hand at this poster session.
 
 
BIG HORN MEDICINE WHEEL: A PHOTOGRAPHIC TOUR OF ASTRONOMICAL ALIGNMENTS
Dale W. Smith
BGSU Planetarium
Department of Physics & Astronomy
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio  43403
dwsmith@bgsu.edu
 
Abstract: The Big Horn Medicine Wheel in Wyoming is a Native American stone circle with several stone cairns around its perimeter. Lines of sight among these cairns encode probable astronomical alignments. This poster features explanations of these alignments and photographs taken during a July 2017 visit to the site.
 
 
NATIONAL CHEMISTRY WEEK: CHEMISTRY IS OUT OF THIS WORLD!
April Whitt
Fernbank Science Center
156 Heaton Park Drive NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30307
april.whitt@dekalbschoolsga.org
 
Abstract: Every year the American Chemical Society (ACS) sponsors National Chemistry Week, with a different theme each time. This year’s theme is “Chemistry is Out of this World.” It’s the perfect opportunity to partner with colleagues or make new contacts, and offer astronomy activities for your public audiences. Fernbank Science Center is celebrating on Saturday, November 3.
 
 
STREAMING SCIENCE
Annie Wilson
Ward Beecher Planetarium
Youngstown State University
Youngstown, Ohio 44555
annie.wilson@pobox.com
 
Pamela Gay
Astronomical Society of the Pacific
pamela@astrosociety.org
 
Matthew Richardson
Planetary Science Institute
mrichardson@psi.edu
 
Joseph Myers
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
josephlmyers@gmail.com
 
Susie Murph
Astronomical Society of the Pacific
susanmmurph@gmail.com
 
Nancy J. Graziano
Astronomical Society of the Pacific
nancy.graziano@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Most weeks I stream on Twitch for Science Sunday. I focus on colorizing telescope data for my live audience. During the process, I talk about to my audience about the processes that turn data into pretty pictures.
 
 
Workshops:
 
 
GLIPSA PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP
Karrie Berglund
Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.
817 Pacific Avenue
Bremerton, Washington 98337
karrie@digitaliseducation.com
 
Keith Davis
University of Notre Dame Digital Visualization Theater
148 Jordan Hall of Science
Notre Dame, Indiana 46556
 
Michael McConville
Spitz, Inc.
700 Brandywine Drive
Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania19317
 
Dayna Thompson
Charles W. Brown Planetarium
Ball State University, CP101
2100 West Riverside Avenue
Muncie, Indiana 47306
 
Abstract: This all day workshop was intended to give GLPA attendees a sense of what happens at the annual Live Interactive Planetarium Symposium (LIPS). LIPS is a multi-day gathering that focuses on all facets of live programming: Presentation skills; sample activities; etc.  GLIPSA was open to anyone registered to attend GLPA. As with LIPS, ideas and content presented at GLIPSA applied to everyone who does live shows, no matter whether those shows are in a portable dome or fixed, with a digital system or starball. 2018 was the sixth GLIPSA, and there were were 24 attendees.
 
 
CONSTRUCTION OF A DRAMATIC CLASSROOM SPECTRUM PROJECTOR
Gary Tomlinson
5075 Division Ave N
Comstock Park, Michigan 49321
gtomlins@sbcglobal.net
 
Abstract: This workshop details construction and use of an inexpensive classroom lab station where students can actually investigate how to add and subtract colors from a spectrum, the effect of filters, and an absorption spectrum. In addition it shows the construction of a device to show dramatically that there are an infinite number of colors in a rainbow.
 
 
CONSTRUCTION OF A UNIQUE TABLE TOP MODEL OF THE EARTH, SUN, & MOON
Gary Tomlinson
5075 Division Ave N
Comstock Park, Michigan 49321
gtomlins@sbcglobal.net
 
Abstract: This workshop details the construction and use of an inexpensive classroom lab station where students can actually investigate seasons, day & night, moon phases, eclipse and the reasons for each. In addition it allows students to measure the time and direction of sunrise/set at different latitudes as well as the altitude of the mid-day Sun.
 
 
KINESTHETIC LEARNING UNDER THE DOME
Tiffany Stone Wolbrecht
Ward Beecher Planetarium
Youngstown State University
1 University Plaza
Youngstown, Ohio 44555
tiffany.wolbrecht@gmail.com
 
Abstract: With the stunning visuals produced in planetariums, we are experts in visual teaching. But what about those who learn by doing?  In this workshop we will discuss how people learn and how to use kinesthetic practices to engage audiences in a planetarium setting. Examples include introducing planets to 3-year-olds and explaining how we locate black holes to a general audience. Join us if you want to engage your guests in new ways and be ready to get moving with activities of your own creation!