GLPA Conference Proceedings: 2007

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2007 Proceedings PDF:
 
2007 Supplemental Materials:
 
 

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Invited Talks

ASTRONOMY UPDATE 2007
James B. Kaler
Abstract: The year was led by Cassini's Saturn and methane-filled Titan, as well as by Hubble, which will indeed get its repair (if all goes well) in 2008. And let's not forget the Rovers' Mars, on which the little guys continue to roam and discover. Plan on parties for Uranus's equinox on December 7, and for new views of Pluto in 2015. Pluto gets a minor planet number, but so too does Eris. Our planets and their debris remind us of the remarkable number of discoveries that bring the exo-planet count to 255 (and counting) that include a five-earth-mass measure. Brown dwarfs continue to fall from the sky, Altair now has an actual image, and a record super-supernova lit someone's distant sky. At least we do not have to be so afraid of a nearby gamma-ray burst. Dark matter is more real than ever, while we can now make out some structure in the time-history of dark energy. Huge surveys also begin to show us not just the nature of the Universe, but our place in it as well.

A NIGHTWATCHMAN'S JOURNEY:
MY LIFE AND HARD TIMES AS A COMET HUNTER
David Levy
Abstract: During the summer of 1965, I was a camper at a place called the Adirondack Science Camp in upstate New York, about 40 miles south of Plattsburgh. While there we were each assigned to do a project. The director did not wish to see the projects completed by the end of the summer. Instead, he hoped for some progress, even if that progress were to end in failure. I believed he wanted to see some failure, because in his view, failure is the great teacher. It was not until October 1965 that I decided to begin my telescopic search, which subsequently started on December 17, 1965. This talk recounts that adventure, which continues to this day.
Editor's Note: This text is based on an edited transcript of the oral presentation and retains the presentation's conversational style.

A JOURNEY TO THE STARS
2007 Armand N. Spitz Lecture
2007 Margaret Noble Address
2007 SEPA Banquet Lecture
Dr. James Sweitzer
Abstract: The ability of planetarium technology to transport us is evolving faster than ever. Fifty years ago real space travel began with the launch of Sputnik. Twenty years after that, "Star Wars" revolutionized how we imagine cosmic adventure. Today, digital planetariums can simulate travel anywhere in the universe. Like Luke Skywalker, today's planetarium director must navigate an "asteroid belt" of digital technology and an explosive pace of scientific discovery. As exciting as the new digital planetariums have become, production and maintenance costs threaten our missions. Yet over all these years, no matter what the technology or science, a meaningful human story has been our most trusted guide star. This presentation will explore a scientific story based upon the visualization of a relativistic journey into deep space to the newly discovered Gliese 581 D. What mistakes did George Lucas make in his films? What would it really be like to travel near the speed of light? What will we find along our journey? "A Journey to the Stars" promises to tackle these and other mind-expanding questions.
Editor's Note: This text is based on an edited transcript of the oral presentation.

EXPLORING A NEW WORLD:
TITAN AS REVEALED BY CASSINI'S RADAR
Dr. Charles A. Wood
Abstract: Saturn's moon Titan is larger than the planet Mercury and has a dense atmosphere like a planet. Until Cassini and its atmosphere-piercing radar got to Saturn, little was known of Titan. Now with 20% of the surface revealed, Titan is seen to have a very young surface, seas of dunes, and hundred of lakes and a few large seas of liquid methane/ethane. We can infer that Titan is dynamically active, possibly with erupting volcanoes, blowing sediments, rainfall and rising and falling lake levels. In the debate about what is a planet, Titan would be considered a planet in all ways, except that it orbits another one.
Editor's Note: This text is based on an edited transcript of the oral presentation.

 

Contributed Papers

NEW HORIZONS' MISSION TO PLUTO AND BEYOND
Wendy Ackerman
Abstract: Maryland Science Center (MSC) is a partner for education and public outreach with Applied Physics Lab (APL) for the New Horizons mission. Hear about what we've been up to, some simple activities we do and pick up some fun materials.

HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE - SERVICING MISSION 4 UPDATE
Lucy Albert
Abstract: Current plans for the refurbishing of the Hubble Space Telescope during the upcoming servicing mission and the installation of two new instruments will provide cutting edge astrophysics science data for the next several years. The Office of Public Outreach at Space Telescope Science Institute has resources for planetariums to provide additional information to their public.
Editor's Note: Images of several of the instruments can be found in the file Albert.pdf in the supplementary materials folder.

AUDIENCE RESPONSE IN THE PLANETARIUM:
INSTRUMENTS FOR SOCIAL LEARNING
Audra Baleisis & Michael Magee
Abstract: We discuss prototyping a planetarium show that combines audience response technology with simple, yet powerful, educational techniques such as misconceptions research and peer instruction to enable personalized learning in a group setting.

MUSIC UNDER THE DOME - TECHNIQUES THAT MAXIMIZE IMPACT
Adam Barnes
Shai Fishman
Abstract: This presentation introduces new composing and scoring techniques for planetarium shows, featuring methods for creating anticipation, increasing the effect of visuals, and developing audience identification with characters.

INVITATION TO JOIN THE OAS*
Jon U. Bell
Abstract: The author/presenter, in order to promote knowledge of constellations and asterisms useful for sky interpretation, proposes the establishment of the O.A.S. - Obscure Asterism Society.

FROM PANIC TO PEACEFUL PROGRESS:
THE STORY OF SPUTNIK
Robert Bonadurer
Abstract: Fifty years ago Sputnik flew. It was both revered and feared. Regardless, the world was not the same. The space race had begun. America had to catch up. Science was significant again. One consequence? We needed to teach people about space. Planetariums proliferated across America. And here we are. This paper will look at the impact of Sputnik since that cool autumn Friday back in 1957 and is the articulate summary of special Sputnik lectures given at the Daniel M. Soref Planetarium at the Milwaukee Public Museum on October 3 and 4, 2007.

PLANETARIUM PRESENTERS:
PROCEDURES, POSSIBILITIES, & PREDICAMENTS
Robert Bonadurer
Abstract: Hiring? It's not easy. Call it another critical cosmic challenge. The job calls for a wide variety of skill sets. They have to handle "techno-stress." They need to know the sky beyond the Big Dipper and Orion. They need to engage audiences and light up the night! And yet, their hours are small. This paper will give a few celestial clues to help ensure a heavenly hire.

REFRACTORS TO REFLECTORS - LENSES TO MIRRORS - WHAT WORKED FOR THE TELESCOPE NOW WORKS FOR THE DOME
Tony Butterfield
Abstract: Convex spherical mirrors can replace lenses in delivering wide angle full-dome images to a dome. This technology was first introduced over seven years ago and has led to another digital milestone in the planetarium community. This flexible open architecture display system gives another choice for planetariums to consider when upgrading. Attend this program to see how you might apply this new projection technology.

2009 BATON ROUGE INVITATIONAL
Jon W. Elvert
Abstract: The Irene W. Pennington Planetarium has invited all seven U.S. affiliates for their annual conference meeting in 2009. This paper defines the proposal including why this septuplet conjunction conference is significant.

THE SKIES OVER HOGWARTS
Amie Gallagher
Abstract: Our eclectic group of witches and wizards guides you through a "Harry Potter"-themed tour of the night sky.

SAVE THE PLANETARIUM FUND, INC.: WHAT CAN WE DO FOR YOU?
Richard Gamba
Abstract: Save the Planetarium Fund, Inc. is a charitable, non-profit organization that came to be in response to the announced closure of the Novins Planetarium in NJ. We would like to hear your thoughts on expanding our efforts to a national scale.

MAKE CONTACT - THE MINNESOTA PLANETARIUM SOCIETY
Sally Goff
Abstract: The Minnesota Planetarium Society is in the midst of its Make Contact Campaign to build the Minnesota Planetarium and Space Discovery Center, set to open in 2010, and is successfully building its outreach with the ExploraDome Immersive Learning Program.

FRIENDS, OUR SKIES HAVE SOME PROBLEMS!
Thomas Wm. Hamilton
Abstract: A planetarium promoting creationism and a 6000 year old universe is just one sign of problems being faced by a profession that attempts to represent one of the sciences to the public. "Yahoo Answers" is a public website that allows anyone to ask or answer a question on any topic. The questions being asked, and some of the answers being offered, suggest that the public's view of astronomy rests somewhere back around 1500 A.D.

EXTENDING GUIDED TOURS FROM PHYSICAL TO VIRTUAL SPACE
USING A PLANETARIUM
Kerry Handron & Jeffery Jacobson
Abstract: The Carnegie Museum of Natural History (CMNH) [1] is using its Earth Theater (an all-digital dome display) to take audiences to Ancient Egypt, a Seneca Village, and other impossible to visit places. Similar to a live star tour, a tour guide in the theater is able to visually move the audience through a three-dimensional computer-generated world, much as a tour through a physical place or collection. Each of our virtual environments augments existing physical collections in the museum, opening many possibilities for mixed-media presentations. Recent advances in desktop computers, digital projectors, game engine-based computer graphics software, and virtual reality freeware have made this possible at very low cost. This has allowed us to concentrate our resources on acquiring content and developing exhibits.

LIVE PRESENTATION SKILLS: LEARN FROM OTHERS!
Geoff Holt
Abstract: We all learn so much from each other at planetarium conferences. But don't you wish you could sit in on actual live shows conducted by our peers in front of real audiences? This paper session presents video clips of a few tips I've picked up by recording other planetarians. And the plea will be made for YOU to submit video or audio clips to be considered for a future DVD on live presentation techniques.

3-SCREEN VIDEO ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET
Geoff Holt
Abstract: Slides provide a nice static image, but the dynamic nature of space science requires frequent updates and visuals with motions. Unfortunately, many of us can't afford a nice turnkey video system like the ones many of our vendors could aptly provide. The task becomes quite challenging when you want to use this system for both live and recorded programs. This session explores some of the barricades and potholes encountered on the road to success in Madison, Wisconsin.

PIXELS ON THE DOME
Ronald Kaitchuck
Abstract: With the wide spread conversion to digital image production and projection there is much discussion about the required number of pixels in an image. It appears that decisions are often based on experience or gut feelings. This paper presents actual calculations based on the resolution of the human eye and viewer location in the room. In this way, some general guidelines are presented for digital image resolution and pixel requirements for scanned and computer generated images.

CHEAP STUFF THAT WORKS
Dave Hostetter
Abstract: Even in today's high-tech planetaria, sometimes the simple things work well.

PHOENIX: ON MARS AND IN THE CLASSROOM
Dr. David W. Hurd
Abstract: On August 4th, the Phoenix Mars Lander took off for. you guessed it, Mars! In its wake, Phoenix left behind a cadre of high school teachers and students who will work directly with mission scientists. This paper reviews mission status and the Phoenix Student Intern Program. It will also highlight resources for informal educators to use with regard to the Phoenix Mars Lander and suggest ways planetaria can become more involved in future missions

400 YEARS OF THE TELESCOPE: A PROGRAM FOR 2009
Shawn Laatsch
Abstract: Most planetarium professionals now know 2009 is the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Planetariums and science centers around the world will be gearing up and looking for ways to share this celebration with our patrons and raise awareness of astronomy. In March of 2007, a unique partnership was formed that will lead to a planetarium program celebrating the history of the telescope. This program will be produced in collaboration and conjunction with a PBS two-part documentary and unique educational resources to provide an integrated way to celebrate the IYA in 2009. This article will take a look at how the project began and how it will benefit IPS members.

OLD STARRY: THE FIRST PLANETARIAN
Rob Landis
Abstract: Born in 1809 on a poor farm near present day Morganfield, Kentucky, Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel grew up with an uncanny passion for astronomy. In a very Jeffersonian way, he was committed to communicate the wonders of astronomy to the broader public. Not only was he [arguably] America's first astronomer, he was the world's first planetarian, inspiring and leading the development of the Cincinnati Observatory as well as the first popular journal of astronomy, The Sidereal Messenger. A classmate of Robert E. Lee (USMA, 1829), the men under Mitchel's command fondly referred to him as "Old Stars" and "Old Starry".

CONSTELLATION AND THE NEO ALTERNATIVE
Rob Landis
Abstract: Planetarians are the most effective public communicators of astronomy and space activities. In my experience, planetarians are not mildly interested in what NASA does, but wildly enthusiastic! The Constellation Program (CxP) at NASA is charged with developing the spacecraft and launch vehicles to return humans to the Moon and beyond. Part of the "beyond" may be closer than we thought! A recent Constellation (Cx) funded study examined the feasibility of piloted flights to near-Earth objects (NEOs). Such a mission would mark the first human expedition to an interplanetary body beyond the Earth-Moon system.

VISUALIZING THE PLANETS: A MARRIAGE OF MEDIA
Gary Lazich
Abstract: This presentation describes a unique approach to orchestrating a live "visual spectacular" in which Gustav Holst's suite The Planets became the soundtrack for a chronicle of the Space Age. Video excerpts will illustrate the approach.

CREATING PHOTO-REAL VIRTUAL 3D WORLDS FROM THE HiRISE MARS CAMERA IMAGERY DATA
Mark J. Prusten
Michael V. Magee
Abstract: The generation of interactive virtual 3D environments from the HiRise Mars Camera imagery data is presented for full-dome planetarium theaters. This paper describes the production workflow pipeline for creating these environments along with the challenges of handling very large data sets to generate the environment texture maps for photo-real animations.
Editor's note: The Figures for this paper were not received by press time, so could not be included in the Proceedings.

PROCEDURAL ANIMATION OF NEBULA GAS SYSTEM STRUCTURE
Mark J. Prusten
Abstract: The procedural generation of volumetric Nebula gaseous systems and their animation is presented for full-dome planetarium theaters. This paper describes the production workflow pipeline for creating, animating and rendering these self-luminous environments and the challenges to generate this phenomena in photo-real animations.
Editor's note: The Figures for this paper were not received by press time, so could not be included in the Proceedings.

REAL HEROES FOR TODAY'S YOUTH:
RELIVING EARLY MANNED SPACEFLIGHT
Fran Ratka
Abstract: Children of today have very few role models that are positive and careers in science and technology are no longer highly valued. They did not grow up during the exciting times of Sputnik and the frontiers of human spaceflight. Presenting the story of early manned spaceflight and the race to the Moon is interesting, fun and very inspiring to all age levels. This paper will outline the methods used for both third graders and high school astronomy students to give them a taste of the amazing events in early manned spaceflight.

SUITS-BUECHE PLANETARIUM:
THE FINAL RENOVATION - FOR NOW
Steven L. J. Russo
Abstract: The Suits-Bueche Planetarium at the Schenectady Museum has just finished the final phase of four years of renovations; for now! A new Science Center with a larger planetarium is in planning.

" ENGAGE" - A CHECKLIST FOR PLANETARIUM PILOTS
John C. Scala
Abstract: Any good pilot (or starship Captain) knows to follow his or her checklist prior to launch. For a successful planetarium experience for your audience, the five "E's" serve as your guide. Engage your mind, and learn how to make use of these proven tools for your presentations.

OUTREACH TO SPACE - A COLLABORATIVE MODEL
FOR RURAL COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Sheldon Schafer & Nick Rae
Abstract: OTS is a collaborative of 11 midwestern and west coast science museums. Members have developed a set of portable, interactive astronomy exhibits that will be delivered to non-traditional venues in 2008-2009. This paper will present the key elements of this program.

STUDENT RESISTANCE TO SCIENCE INSTRUCTION
Brock Schroeder, Ph.D.
Abstract: Attendees to this session will be introduced to a set of conceptual change teaching strategies that are beneficial when encountering students that may exhibit resistance to science due to their faith. Through the effective use of conceptual change teaching strategies, given time using them to teach content, through meaningful reflection and conversations, and by building a sense of trust, a faculty member can increase the science literacy of the student.

NEW HORIZONS: BRIDGE TO THE BEGINNING
Patty Seaton
Abstract: Our planetarium is partnered with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab to develop a planetarium program highlighting the New Horizons mission to Pluto. Hear snippets of our program along with the process we took to make this a unique experience for all audiences.

ALL-DOME FOR CHILDREN ON THE CHEAP:
WILBEAR'S ADVENTURES ACROSS THREE REGIONS
Sharon Shanks
Alan Davenport
Abstract: In which we learn how Wilbear was born in Florida, grew up in GLPA-land, traveled far away to SEPA territory to become a nifty all-dome hero, and landed in MAPS-Maine to face another transformation; or, to be boring, how three planetariums across three regions cooperated to produce an almost no-cost all dome program for young audiences.

LIVE SHOTS FOR PLANETARIUM PRODUCTION
Todd K. Slisher
Abstract: In the new show production for "Bad Astronomy: Myths and Misconceptions" there were many lessons learned as we grappled with new forms of Planetarium production that grow ever closer to tradition TV and Movie production techniques. This paper introduces the reader to some of the challenges of live shots on rather limited budgets for full-dome planetarium production and presents some solutions that were used during the making of "Bad Astronomy".

A LARGELY SELF-TAUGHT ASTRONOMY HONORS COURSE
Dale W. Smith
Abstract: Description of an astronomy honors course for non-majors in which carefully-crafted assignments are the primary teaching mechanism.

EXHIBITS-PLANETARIUM CONNECTION:
REVENUE GENERATED & LESSONS LEARNED
Carolyn Sumners
Abstract: The Burke Baker Planetarium has created ten full-dome shows to accompany major traveling exhibitions at the Houston Museum of Natural Science with co-marketing and combo ticketing. This paper explains what makes a show that effectively complements an exhibit experience and benefits from the co-marketing exposure.

PORTABLE DIGITAL THEATERS:
WHAT TEACHERS CHOOSE FROM STARS AND SEVENTEEN MOVIES
Carolyn Sumners
Abstract: The Houston Museum of Natural Science travels 3 portable dome theaters and reached over 38,000 visitors in 2006. This paper discusses the programs chosen by teachers at different grade levels; the dome schedules teachers arranged, the role of standardized tests, and the opportunity to create career awareness.

FULL-DOME PHOTOGRAPHY -
TECHNIQUES FOR SHOOTING AND POST-SHOOTING
Carolyn Sumners
Adam Barnes
Abstract: This presentation includes shooting to maximize effect, minimize cross talk, retain resolution, and create apparent motion. We describe techniques for incorporating full-dome photographs in productions along with animations and as a background for embedding videos.

EVALUATING IMMERSION: LEARNING IN A DIGITAL THEATER
Carolyn Sumners
Patricia Reiff
Abstract: The Houston Museum of Natural Science in collaboration with Rice University has traveled portable digital theaters for over three years and conducted research on student learning in this immersive environment. This paper documents interactive techniques and learning strategies in full-dome digital theaters. The presentation is divided into Evaluation Strategies and Results and Interactivity Strategies and Results.

THE PLANETS - A SEPA PLANETARIUM PRODUCTION
Adam Thanz
Abstract: This engaging planetarium show is being distributed for FREE to all facilities that have SEPA membership. The program highlights narration by Kate Mulgrew, music by Jonn Serrie, script by Jon Bell, and animations by Allen Davis. Non-SEPA members can purchase the show at a low cost.

THE ASTRONOMICAL LEAGUE - AMATEURS UNITED
David Weinrich
Abstract: The Astronomical League is one of the largest amateur astronomical associations in the world. The programs, publications, and meetings of the League often dovetail nicely with planetarium interests. My association with the Astronomical League has rekindled my passion for observing the night sky. In this presentation I will summarize the resources that the League can offer planetarians.

PLANETARIUM POTPOURRI:
RECENT PUBLIC ACTIVITIES AT FERNBANK
April Whitt
Abstract: The Fernbank Science Center offered a variety of events for the general public this year and is a host for the IPY Polar Palooza. Come get some ideas and share in the fun.

 

Posters

MILKY WAY SKYLORE
Dayle L. Brown
Abstract: The third book in the Skylore series is in publication! Preview two of the ancient stories from around the world about the Milky Way and see the full-color illustrations.

THE INTERNATIONAL PLANETARIUM SOCIETY'S WEBSITE
Susan Reynolds Button
Abstract: The International Planetarium Society's website (http://www.ips-planetarium.org) exists specifically to provide news and resources to IPS members. It also serves as a tool to publicize the good work of the Society, to engage non-members, and to provide links to related websites.

NIGHT SKY NOTES
John French
Abstract: A new Internet offering from the Abrams Planetarium, "Night Sky Notes" is a text based daily description of what's up in the night sky. Using RSS Feed format, this can be easily incorporated into your planetarium's web page.

SAVE THE PLANETARIUM FUND, INC.: THE NEXT STEPS
Richard Gamba
Abstract: Save the Planetarium Fund, Inc. is a charitable, non-profit organization brought to life as a grassroots effort to reopen the Novins Planetarium in NJ. With the support of all the members of the planetarium community, we are looking to expand our efforts to a national scale.

MAKING MODELS - TURNING TRASH INTO TREASURE
Mary Elizabeth Hiller
Abstract: Building spacecraft models out of household or inexpensive materials is as easy as 1, 2, 3 when that big, expensive spacecraft model just won't fit into your little budget.

ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF THE PACIFIC (ASP): CREATING LINKAGES AND PARTNERSHIPS IN THE ASTRONOMY/SPACE SCIENCE COMMUNITY
James B. Kaler
James G. Manning
Suzy Gurton
Michael G. Gibbs
Marni Berendsen
Anna Hurst
Vivian White
Pablo Nelson
Abstract: The Astronomical Society of the Pacific's mission is to advance science literacy through an understanding and appreciation of astronomy while serving diverse audiences through networks of educational programming, services, resource materials, and recognition. These audiences include educators at schools, science and nature centers, planetariums and the audiences they also serve. The ASP develops training and resources for three major audiences of educators; amateur astronomers, informal science educators, and K-14 formal educators. All continue to thrive as we work to provide ongoing and updated resources and recognition for their efforts to serve their audiences in exemplary ways.

TELESCOPE-BUILDING: SPREADING ENTHUSIASM TO THE SKY
Linda M. Krouse-Wright
Abstract: Text describing how to start a telescope-building program in your area.

WASHINGTON COUNTY OBSERVATORY
Rod Martin
Abstract: The Washington County, Maryland, Public Schools is constructing an observatory at its Fairview Outdoor School. The process began in 2005 during an informal discussion between the planetarium resource teacher and the superintendent of schools.

SUMMARY OF IDEAS GRANT USED FOR PLANETARIUM PROGRAM
Kim Small
Abstract: A brief summary of how a $40,109.00 grant was used to improve a K-12 school district planetarium program will be presented.

THE MAKING OF LUCY'S CRADLE
Carolyn Sumners
Adam Barnes
Tony Butterfield
Abstract: The Burke Baker Planetarium staff developed or perfected several new animation techniques including plate tectonic morphing, creating building interiors from photographs, animation of a flat mural, and making a Lucy skeleton walk as anthropologists think she did.

FULL-DOME PHOTOGRAPHY FROM SPACE - COMING THIS FALL!
Carolyn Sumners
Tony Butterfield
Adam Barnes
Abstract: The astronauts of STS 120, scheduled to launch in late October, will carry a large-format fisheye camera inside the Space Shuttle and to the International Space Station. Training photos from the Johnson Space Center show what images we can expect from orbit.

A SELECTION OF SKY EVENTS IN 2008
Robert C. Victor
Abstract: Some attractive groupings of planets, stars, and Moon visible in North America in 2008.

THOUGHTS ON COMET HALLEY 2061
Robert C. Victor
Abstract: A case for including a preview of Halley's next apparition in our next comet show.

THE PAYOFF FOR MUTUAL COLLABORATION: EVERYONE WINS
Elizabeth Wasiluk
Jason Best
Abstract: In a time of dwindling budgets and staff cutting, it pays to form a partnership with others who do similar work. The authors share their ideas about how they use their partnership to continue and promote astronomy in the Eastern Panhandle Area of West Virginia. Their partnership has allowed their outreach to expand. Among the products of collaboration: classroom outreaches at the elementary, middle, and high school levels; collaborative presentations at scientific forums; and the development and teaching of courses for in-service teachers, funded by Eisenhower grants, using both the planetarium and university laboratories. The new Shepherd University Observatory will provide further opportunities for both high school and college students in the area, benefiting both groups as well as the general public.

IPS UPDATE
David Weinrich
Abstract: The IPS Council met in August at the Planetario da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The poster addresses the IPS conferences in 2008 and 2010, the new Brazilian affiliate, the IPS Star Partners Fund, the Armand Spitz Planetarium Education Fund, and other IPS news.

SCIENCE PROGRAMS AT PARI
Christi Whitworth
Abstract: PARI's mission to offer STEM activities to all ages has produced stellar results.

 

Workshops

EXPERIENCE A "DOWN UNDER" VIEW OF THE SKY!
Jeanne Bishop
Dayle L. Brown
Susan Button
Abstract: During this workshop you will get a fresh perspective as we examine the apparent motion of the sun, moon and stars as seen from the Southern Hemisphere. Your brain may get a bit confused but we will assist you in finding your way by identification of prominent asterisms and constellations. Then you will be treated to some fascinating stories and interpretations of the sky from ancient Southern Hemisphere cultures.

SKYLORE FROM THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE:
SOUTH AMERICA AND AFRICA
Dayle Brown
Abstract: Let's travel south of the equator to hear some of the stories told about the sky in South America and Africa.

YEAR(S) OF DARK SKIES
Chuck Bueter
Abstract: The Year(s) of Dark Skies workshop introduces the 2009 International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009) and U.S. programs that will address the theme "Dark Skies are a Universal Resource." Several in-dome demonstrations illustrate glare, light trespass, and sky glow while allowing learners both to discover the dark sky issues and to propose action to minimize the impact of outdoor lighting. Workshop participants will simulate the Globe at Night program, a Cornerstone Project of the worldwide IYA2009 effort, and will get insight on using Sky Quality Meters available for free to successful applicants. Supporting material is at www.nightwise.org.

INTEGRATING SOLAR EXPERIENCES INTO THE CLASSROOM AND PLANETARIUM
Amie Gallagher
Theresa Moody
Abstract: The New Jersey Astronomy Center integrated a new planetarium show featuring "Our Very Own Star" as developed by the Lawrence Hall of Science into a Solar Curriculum. This middle and high school curriculum titled "Our Solar Connection" was developed by NJACE and New Jersey Institute of Technology's Solar Physics department with funding from NASA. Participants will engage in activities from this curriculum interspersed with video fragments of the planetarium show.

PUTTING PIXELS IN YOUR PORTABLE! - USING DIGITAL IMAGES, ANIMATION, AND SOUND IN YOUR TRAVELING PLANETARIUM PROGRAMS
Paul J. Krupinski
Abstract: During this workshop, the author will demonstrate part of an actual day-night program called © Sky Wonder, a lesson for Grades 1 & 2. Using a low-tech planetarium doesn't mean you cannot use some high-tech techniques in your science lessons. See how a laptop computer and LCD projector can enhance your students' planetarium experience with images, animation, and sound under your dome.

TWO LESSONS FOR A PORTABLE PLANETARIUM:
THE MOON & BIRD MIGRATION
John T. Meader
Abstract: In the past three years I've developed two new projection cylinders and the accompanying curriculum materials for Starlab Planetariums. The two units are on The Moon and Bird Migration. Learn how these two diverse topics can be effectively explored in a portable planetarium and how they both relate to a basic star field. Here are two lessons, one for the Moon and one on Bird Migration. They are the lessons presented quickly (45 min.) at the Triple Conjunction Conference. Both lessons are presented here with more detail than could be presented at the workshops. I have included the full lesson for those who would like to replicate them.

THE REASON FOR THE SEASONS
Gene Zajac
Abstract: "The Reason for the Seasons" is a lesson I do in the planetarium and one I do at schools without the planetarium. When in the planetarium, I do the first part outside of the dome or under the dome with the lights on. My main audience is second grade but I have used it with fourth grade and my high school class. Adults like it as well.