GLPA Conference Proceedings: 2010

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2010 Proceedings PDF:
 
2010 Supplemental Materials:
 

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Invited Talks

 

ENTHUSIASM FLOWING IN THE GLPA WATERSHED

2010 Armand Spitz Lecture

 

Chuck Bueter

15893 Ashville Lane

Granger, Indiana 46530

bueter@nightwise.org

 

Abstract: As Armand Spitz experienced, stargazing on the open water can beget unparalleled celestial sights—like a Genesis night that encourages the pursuit of astronomy.  The Great Lakes Planetarium Association is a watershed of talented astronomy educators who exude enthusiasm for their craft.  The planetarium profession has been greatly enriched by dedicated GLPA members who daily modify Einstein's elegant math, converting energy into what matters for their communities and colleagues alike.

 
 

DARK ENERGY

 

Dr. Peter M. Garnavich

Dept. of Physics

University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame, Indiana  46556

pgarnavi@nd.edu

 

Editor's note:
No title, abstract, or text submitted.
Contact the author for further information.
 
 

ASTRONOMY UPDATE FOR THE PLANETARIAN: 2010

 

Dr. Ronald Kaitchuck

Ball State University Planetarium

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Ball State University

Muncie, Indiana  47306

rkaitchu@bsu.edu

 

Abstract: This year the question about water on the Moon may have been finally answered.  The evidence for ancient oceans on Mars continued to grow and new analysis of the Allan Hills meteorite again suggests there was once bacterial life on Mars.  The Mars rover Spirit is permanently stuck and may be at the end of its mission while Opportunity continues its trip to a large crater.  Asteroids have been found with excessive layers of dust and, in one case, surface ice.  There was a collision of two asteroids in the asteroid belt.  Jupiter was struck by a small comet or asteroid on two occasions and the South Equatorial Cloud Belt has disappeared.  The Galileo spacecraft orbiting Saturn continues to show us surprising structures in the ring system.  The structure of the Sun’s heliopause is being studied for the first time, and the results are surprising.  This was a year for the discovery of extreme stars: the most massive, the coolest, the fastest binary, and new types of supernovae.  Epsilon Aurigae remains a mystery star in a class by itself.  The rate of exoplanet discoveries is accelerating.  WMAP further refines key numbers that describe the universe.

 

Contributed Papers

 
AAVSO’s CITIZEN SKY PROJECT
 
Garry F. Beckstrom
Delta College Planetarium and Learning Center
100 Center Avenue
Bay City, Michigan  48708
garrybeckstrom@delta.edu
 
Abstract: The American Association of Variable Star Observers’ Citizen Sky Project provides an opportunity for planetariums to show their visitors how science works.  The star Epsilon Aurigae is in the midst of a rare eclipse by a mysterious companion.  This star is bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye and anyone interested can collect useful data and have a chance to experience real scientific research.  Planetariums can provide periodic science updates during live show segments as new information becomes available and explanations unfold.  You can also hold workshops for students, scouts, and other visitors interested in learning more about how science works.
 
 
DISSECTING A TASK: WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO UNDERSTAND AN ASTRONOMICAL CONCEPT?
 
Jeanne E. Bishop
Westlake Schools Planetarium
24525 Hilliard Road
Westlake, Ohio  44145
jeanneebishop@wowway.com
 
Abstract: Although understanding a science concept might come in a flash—an "aha experience"—the foundations of understanding are laid in steps.  Many of the steps for an astronomical concept are perceptual.  The ones that form the view from space are best done with models, to convey 3-D aspects of the space bodies.  However, a diagram or picture also can work.  The view from Earth best is given by the real or the planetarium sky.  In this paper, I will take apart the concept of lunar phases and show what is needed to understand it.  A person does not fully understand lunar phases unless he or she has the ability to coordinate the sky view with the Earth view, bringing both together in what Piaget termed a "projective concept."  That concluding step might come in a flash.  The coordination of the two views does not occur for most until after age 13.  We need to promote the fact that the Earth view often is omitted or minimized in classroom teaching, but that it can be taught well in planetariums.
 
 
COSMIC COLORS: A NEW SHOW FROM GLPA
 
Robert Bonadurer
Milwaukee Public Museum
800 West Wells Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233
bonadurer@mpm.edu
 
David DeRemer
Charles Horwitz Planetarium
S14 W28167 Madison St.
Waukesha, WI 53188
dderemer@waukesha.k12.wi.us
 
Abstract: The Great Lakes Planetarium Association (GLPA) is producing a new show called “Cosmic Colors:  An Adventure Along the Spectrum.”  It will cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum with a special emphasis on the visual part we humans see.  The show will be produced in both full dome and traditional versions.  It will premiere next year at the 2011 GLPA conference in Champaign, Illinois.
 
 
TIPS ON HOW TO TEACH CONSTELLATIONS TO OUR AUDIENCES:
PRACTICE INFORMED BY RESEARCH ON MEMORY AND COGNITION
 
Jean Creighton
Sandra Toro Martell
Manfred Olson Planetarium 
Dept. of Physics
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
P.O. Box 413
Milwaukee, Wisconsin  53201-0413
jcreight@uwm.edu
 
Abstract: Planetarium educators try to teach people how to find constellations in the sky; yet many people still have difficulty identifying star patterns.  Does the sequence in which they are presented matter?  What mental associations seem to help with identification?  We provide seven tips for teaching audiences about constellations and discuss findings from our research that have helped us understand why these approaches work.
 
 
LEARNING THROUGH UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
 
Allen Helfen
BGSU Planetarium
Department of Physics & Astronomy
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio  43403
helfena@bgsu.edu
 
 
Abstract: Due to opportunities created through the planetarium and stargaze programs at BGSU, I participated in NSF-funded undergraduate research last summer.  My research looked for variable stars in a globular cluster using a flux-subtraction method.  I will discuss various techniques, problems, results, and the future of the project.
 
 
PRESENTING: LIVE FROM THE PLANETARIUM
 
Geoff Holt
Madison Metropolitan School District Planetarium
201 S Gammon Rd
Madison, Wisconsin  53717
gholt@madison.k12.wi.us
 
Gary Sampson
880 Hi Ridge Ave
Waukesha, Wisconsin  53186
sampsoga@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Over the past 3 years, we've collected 19 hours of video recordings of live planetarium programs demonstrating excellent presentation skills.  The development team has pulled together clips from these recordings and produced a video highlighting some of the techniques.  In this paper, we'll give you a preview of the video.
 
 
GLPA WEB SITE UPDATE
 
Geoff Holt
Madison Metropolitan School District Planetarium
201 S Gammon Rd
Madison, Wisconsin  53717
gholt@madison.k12.wi.us
 
Abstract: The web site team will give you an update on the conversion of our static web site to a content management system.  We'll introduce you to the new features and give you a brief tour.
 
 
SOLAR SYSTEM BOARD GAME FOR CLASSROOM
 
Chris Janssen
Wausau School District Planetarium
1200 West Wausau Ave.
Wausau, Wisconsin  54401
cjanssen@wausau.k12.wi.us
 
Abstract: Do you need a solar system curriculum for your classrooms before they see you in the planetarium?  I’ll share the development and all materials of “The Solar System Race.”  You can make a set for your own teachers.
 
 
THE COMFORTABLE CATADIOPTRIC
 
Roy Kaelin
Department of Arts & Sciences
Prairie State College
202 South Halsted Street
Chicago Heights, Illinois  60411
rkaelin@prairiestate.edu
 
Abstract: A well-crafted, hybrid design of reflector and refractor telescope, available for use at public star parties by observers and students, is portable, easy to use, and readily accessible to parents with small children and to those confined to wheelchairs.  While not a dream telescope, the design can provide a stable platform for astrophotography and allows ease of access to the night sky.
 
 
ASTRONOMY CONVERSATIONS: A GROWING PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THE KAVLI INSTITUTE FOR COSMOLOGICAL PHYSICS (KIPC) AND THE ADLER PLANETARIUM & ASTRONOMY MUSEUM
 
Randall H. Landsberg
Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics
5640 South Ellis Ave.
Chicago, Illinois 60637
randy@oddjob.uchicago.edu
 
Larry Ciupik
Mark SubbaRao
Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum
 
Abstract: Astronomy Conversations bring research scientists and their data into the planetarium, a setting where the public can share in the excitement of discovery.  This program and KICP participation in it have grown dramatically since its inception in 2007.  It currently reaches nearly two thousand visitors each month.
 
 
AN ASSIMILATION OF IDEAS IN ART AND ASTRONOMY
 
Adam Leis
Physics & Astronomy Dept.
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio   43403
adam.m.leis@gmail.com
 
Abstract: I will discuss how I used my focuses in art and astronomy in my Bachelor’s of Fine Arts gallery show, the challenges faced along the way, and the evolution of my concept and project.  Compiling one’s experiences into one project is difficult and consuming, but is also rewarding and gratifying.
 
 
IMAGINARY NEW WORLDS
 
Waylena McCully
Production Designer
William M. Staerkel Planetarium
2400 West Bradley Avenue
Champaign, Illinois  61821
wmccully@parkland.edu
 
Abstract: Creating planets is fun!  See how images taken of the world around us can be used to make imaginary planets, moons, and KBOs.
 
 
GALILEO, KEPLER, AND THE MYSTERIUM COSMOGRAPHICUM
 
Matthew Meixner
Katherine Brading
Dept. of Physics
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, Indiana  46556
matthew.meixner.3@nd.edu
 
Abstract: We will present a series of planetarium scripts and original 3D models that represent Kepler's earliest models for understanding the cosmos.  These models were prepared for and are used to teach Philosophy courses at the University of Notre Dame.
 
Editor's note:
No title, abstract, or text submitted.
Contact the author for further information.
 
 
WISH FULFILLMENT!
 
Alan V. Pareis
Director
Edwin Clark Schouweiler Memorial Planetarium
University of Saint Francis
2702 Spring Street
Fort Wayne, Indiana  46808
 
Abstract: A 1970’s traditional Spitz optomechanical planetarium completes three years of grant-funded renovation and upgrades!  New Atrium!  Automation Additions!  BlissLights!  Elevator Modification!  ViewSpace!  And More!
 
 
LSST (LARGE SCALE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE) AND ITS IMPACT ON PLANETARIUMS
 
Martin Ratcliffe
Sky-Skan, Inc
51 Lake St
Nashua, New Hampshire  03060
ratcliffe@skyskan.com
 
Mark SubbaRao
University of Chicago/Adler Planetarium
1300 South Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois  60605
msubbarao@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile.  Planetariums (digital) are in a unique position to exploit this resource as a teaching tool and in conveying the excitement of modern science.  This short paper introduces LSST and in this session we ask some questions of the planetarium community about the projected quantity and frequency of use of LSST data to help inform the LSST EPO and LSST Data Management System.
 
 
EXTRA-SOLAR PLANET STORIES:
HOW DO ASTRONOMERS KNOW ABOUT WORLDS THEY CAN'T EVEN SEE?
 
Mark S. Reed
Peter F. Hurst Planetarium
c/o Jackson High School
544 Wildwood Avenue
Jackson, Michigan  49201
marksreed@aol.com
 
Abstract:  In the past decade, nearly 500 extra-solar planets have been found.  Press releases tell of planets that rain rocks or Jupiter-sized worlds that orbit their parent star every few days.  How do astronomers find extra-solar planets, determine the physical parameters of these new worlds, and how might the use of a story help our audiences understand more about an exciting area of astronomical research?
 
 
LUNAR RECONNAISSANCE ORBITER: FIRST YEAR RESULTS
 
Doug Roberts
Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum
1300 S. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois  60640
droberts@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has recently completed its primary mission.  There are many datasets available to the public and to planetaria and museums, which show the latest information of Earth's Moon.  Several of the most amazing discoveries from the first year of the LRO mission will be presented.
 
 
SACRAMENTAL CREATION: FAITH AND SCIENCE REUNITED
 
Philip J. Sakimoto
College of First Year of Studies
219 Coleman-Morse Center
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, Indiana  46556
psakimot@nd.edu
 
Leonard DeLorenzo
Institute for Church Life
338 Geddes Hall
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, Indiana  46556
ldeloren@nd.edu
 
Abstract: What planetarian has not had an awkward conversation about science and religion with an agitated customer?  The public perception that these two subjects are somehow antithetical makes it difficult to have a rational discussion.  In a project that arose from needs expressed by Notre Dame’s Institute for Church Life, we have developed a distinctive counter-point.  Sacramental Creation is a live presentation in which theological reflections and astrophysical explanations are blended together in a digital journey through the Universe.  Intellectual arguments are put aside in favor of words and music that lead us to imagine anew the connectedness and sacredness of all creation.  The approach is distinctively Catholic, but it serves as an example of how the affective nature of the digital planetarium can be used to reunite scientific views of the cosmos with the very human nature of faith traditions.
 
 
WHERE'S THE DATA?  THE NEED TO SURVEY PLANETARIUMS FOR EDUCATIONAL EFFICACY
 
Sharon Shanks
Ward Beecher Planetarium
Youngstown State University
One University Plaza
Youngstown, OH 44555
slshanks@ysu.edu
 
Abstract: Ever try to get a grant without supplying hard data to support your request?  Like the classic "where's the beef?"1 commercial, granting institutions want to know "where's the data?" Whether we like it or not, planetariums in informal education settings need to start collecting and analyzing data that support our claims of the efficacy of planetariums in teaching and supporting the teaching of astronomy.  This paper will be the beginning of an effort to collaborate, on a large scale, proof of our educational value.
 
 
TEACHING AND TAKING STELLAR STRUCTURE
 
Dale W. Smith & Allen J. Helfen
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio  43403
 
dsmith@newton.bgsu.edu
helfena@bgsu.edu
 
 
Abstract: We describe the content and teaching techniques of a senior/grad physics/astronomy course from the viewpoint of both teacher and student.
 
 
NEW NATIONAL SCIENCE STANDARDS—NEW NATIONAL PROBLEM?
 
Gary Tomlinson
Chaffee Planetarium, Retired
5075 N. Division
Comstock Park, Michigan  49321
gtomlins@sbcglobal.net
 
Abstract: In 1989 the American Association for the Advancement of Science published “Science for All Americans” as part of its Project 2061 (actually the reform was started by an earlier video entitled “Private Universe”).  This led to "Benchmarks for Science Literacy" in 1993 and then in 1995 to "National Science Education Standards".  Now 15 years later these standards are about to be revised.
 
 
WORKING WITH ART STUDENTS
 
Richard Walker
Longway Planetarium
1310 E. Kearsley St.
Flint, Michigan  48503
rwalker@sloanlongway.org
 
Abstract: This talk will cover my experiences working with a studio art class at Mott Community College to develop the character art for a new planetarium show.
 
 
SUPPORTING ASTRONOMY EDUCATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
 
David Weinrich
Minnesota State University Moorhead
1104 7th Ave. S
Moorhead, Minnesota  56563
weinrich@mnstate.edu
 
Abstract: Even if you can’t travel, you can support astronomy education in the developing world by being a part of an Astro Book Drive.  I’ll cover several examples, including Ghana.
 
 
COLORFUL COSMOS
 
April S. Whitt
Fernbank Science Center
156 Heaton Park Drive NE
Atlanta, Georgia  30307
april_whitt@fc.dekalb.k12.ga.us
 
Abstract: Utilizing the Observing With NASA (OWN) remotely operated telescopes, Fernbank Science Center worked with local school system art teachers and students on NASA’s Colorful Cosmos project during autumn 2009.  Was it the art of science?  The science of art?
 
 

Posters

 
THE SVL: DEVELOPING IMMERSIVE VISUALIZATIONS FOR FULL DOME, STEREO THEATER, ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION DISPLAYS, AND INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCES FOR THE MUSEUM ENVIRONMENT
 
Julieta Aguilera
Mark SubbaRao
José Francisco Salgado
Doug Roberts
Julian Jackson
Mark Paternostro
Patrick McPike
Mark Webb
 
Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum
1300 S. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois  60640
 
jaguilera@adlerplanetarium.org
msubbarao@adlerplanetarium.org
droberts@adlerplanetarium.org
jjackson@adlerplanetarium.org
mpaternostro@adlerplanetarium.org
pmcpike@adlerplanetarium.org
mwebb@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: Opened in February of 2007, the Space Visualization Laboratory (SVL) researches current astronomy data and visualization developments in collaboration with various academic institutions.  The SVL has also a schedule of local and visiting astrophysicists who present their research utilizing the SVL’s immersive 3D, interactive, and ultra-high-resolution devices.  This diverse set of visual explorations enrich the dialog among museum departments and set a vocabulary from which to design dome, 3D theater, and exhibition floor experiences.  In this poster we will present selected case studies and lessons learned.
 
 
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE: A SOURCE FOR SHORT SHOWS
 
Susan C. Batson
North Hills High School Planetarium
53 Rochester Road
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania  15229
batsons@nhsd.net
 
Abstract: Many children’s books can provide a good short lead-in to a planetarium presentation.  Presenting one a foreign language can be attractive to high school classes.
 
 
THE INTERNATIONAL PLANETARIUM SOCIETY
 
Susan Reynolds Button
IPS Past President 2009-2010
8793 Horseshoe Lane
Chittenango, New York  13037
sbuttonq2c@twcny.rr.com
sbuttonq2c@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Learn more about IPS benefits and activities and why you should become a member!
 
 
BRINGING THE COSMOS TO TEACHERS
 
Jean Creighton
Manfred Olson Planetarium
Physics Department
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM)
UWM P.O. Box 413
Milwaukee, Wisconsin  53201
jcreight@uwm.edu
 
Abstract: I have tried the following: teaching an astronomy course for pre-service teachers, giving workshops for in-service teachers, and mentoring seasoned science teachers over the summer to give them research experience.  These projects are very rewarding.
 
 

Workshops

 
HOW DO WE KNOW...?
 
Karrie Berglund
Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.
PO Box 2976
Bremerton, Washington  98310
Karrie@DigitalisEducation.com
 
Abstract: This workshop is a presentation of a lesson of the same name.  The lesson explores how we know what we know about our universe by using the electromagnetic spectrum.  It reviews developments in three major eras: Greco-Roman times, the 17th century, and the late 19th century to today.  “How Do We Know...?” is written for high school students and is aligned with the National Science Education Standards.
 
 
MODERN INSTRUCTIONAL/EVENT PRESENTATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMMERSIVE/PLANETARIUM THEATERS
 
Jeff Bowen
Mike Grznar
Bowen Technovation
7999 East 88th St.
Indianapolis, Indiana  46256
jeffb@bowentechnovation.com
mikeg@bowentechnovation.com
 
Abstract: The modern design for a domed theater should include extensive audio-visual control capabilities for instruction, special events, and other multimedia uses.  This package is one of the most overlooked parts of theater upgrade or new construction design.  We have designed dozens of such modern packages and will address such subjects as:
• where to locate computer and video inputs
• how to network the theater into the LAN
• when to use HDMI ... and when not
• the declining future of VGA computer interfaces
• BlueRay ... or not?
• inclusion of HDTV tuners.5.1 audio from HDTV tuners and DVD
• modern LED, LCD, and DLP projectors ... how to select for PowerPoint, HDTV, etc.
• what is the best way to get live audio mics, keyboards, instruments, etc. into the system?
• why to install widescreen projectors
A workbook will be handed out with exercises.
 
 
TRIP TO TREASURE ISLAND
 
Dayle Brown
Pegasus Productions
6109 Tamerlane Drive
South Bend, Indiana  46614
DayleDavid@comcast.net
 
Abstract: Participants will explore some of the navigational tasks that would have been encountered by the characters in the fictional trip to “Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson.  Participants will work in small “crews” to seek treasure.  They will determine their approximate latitude on earth by measuring the altitude of the North Star using a model of a mariner’s astrolabe.  They will determine their approximate longitude given the time in Greenwich and their local time, and plot their estimated position on earth by means of a map using latitude and longitude.  The winning “crew” will receive “treasure”.
 
 
MATH FAMILY STORIES
 
Susan Reynolds Button
Quarks to Clusters
8793 Horseshoe lane
Chittenango, New York  13037
sbuttonq2c@twcny.rr.com

 
Abstract: Loris Ramponi wrote "Math Family Stories" to convey scientific facts to Italian students in an enjoyable way.  These stories can be used not only for traditional children’s publications, storybooks, science workshops, and shows under planetarium domes.  This initiative was recently expanded to include translating the stories into English language versions.  We will experience one of these stories and a post planetarium lesson activity during this workshop.
 
 
ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS:
A FEW GRAMS OF MATTER IN A BRIGHT WORLD
 
Dr. Kumiko Kotera
Dr. Maria Monasor
Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics
5640 South Ellis Ave.
Chicago, Illinois  60637
 
Abstract: The most energetic particles in the universe are ultra-high energy cosmic rays.  These subatomic particles pack as much energy as a professional tennis player's serve.  Millions of times more powerful than anything produced by man-made accelerators, their origin has been a mystery for about a century.  Over the last several years, an international collaboration of 18 countries joined forces to solve this mystery by building the Pierre Auger Observatory.  Spread over 3000 square kilometers, an area five times the size of Paris, as big as the state of Rhode Island, in western Argentina, this observatory was recently completed.  During its construction, the observatory gathered enough of these rare particles to find the first clues to their origin.  The most energetic of these particles tend to point to cosmologically nearby galaxies that host supermassive black holes at their centers.  Over the next years, scientists working on Auger will be carefully studying these most extreme particles, learning where they come from and what they are made of, in order to solve the longstanding mystery of where they came from and how they are accelerated to the highest energies ever observed.  This workshop will focus on the science of UHECRs and practical tips for using UHECR data in your dome.  For a pre-workshop preview of the observatory and science, see:
 
 
CUTTING EDGE RESEARCH INVADES THE DOME
 
Randy Landsberg
Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics
5640 South Ellis Ave.
Chicago, Illinois  60637
randy@oddjob.uchicago.edu
 
Mark SubbaRao
Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum
1300 S. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois  60640
msubbarao@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: Astrophysical research that pushes the frontiers of our understanding of the universe can seem daunting and complex for planetarium visitors and staff alike.  Join us for full dome visual exploration of modern research.  We will examine a collection of data and images of the remote observatories where the data are taken, and demonstrate how these visualizations can be incorporated into programming at your home institution.  These visual tools were developed through a collaboration between planetarium staff at the Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum and researchers at the University of Chicago and other institutions.  Our journey will include:
• flying through the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data
• being bombarded by ultra high energy cosmic rays
• watching simulations of billions of years of evolution of the large scale structure of the Universe
• viewing simulations of the epoch of re-ionization
• experiencing supernova explosions
• visiting observatories around the globe
 
 
INTRODUCTION TO PRODUCTION WITH FREE SOFTWARE
(a.k.a. "THE BLENDER WORKSHOP")
 
Chris Janssen
Science Department Chair
Wausau School District Planetarium
Wausau West High School
1200 W. Wausau Ave.
Wausau, Wisconsin  54401
cjanssen@wausau.k12.wi.us
 
Waylena McCully
Production Designer
William M. Staerkel Planetarium
Parkland College
2400 West Bradley Ave.
Champaign, Illinois  61821
wmccully@parkland.edu
 
Daniel Tell
Planetarium Technician
Roger B. Chaffee Planetarium
Grand Rapids Public Museum
272 Pearl St. NW
Grand Rapids, Michigan  49504
dtell@grmuseum.org
 
Abstract: The goal of this workshop is to teach beginners how to use free software programs to produce content for planetarium theaters.  While the focus will be on using the free software package Blender for 3D image production and video animation, other free programs will also be introduced.  These techniques should prove useful for both conventional planetarians, and those who have upgraded to full dome.