GLPA Conference Proceedings: 2012

GLPA Members:  You can download these Proceedings using the following link. Note that you must be logged in to download the PDF file.

2012 Proceedings PDF:
 
2012 Supplemental Materials:
 
 
Non-members:  You can order a PDF of this Proceeding ($3) or the entire Proceedings CD ($4) through the online store. They can also be purchased through the mail using the order form.

 

Invited Speakers:

 
PARTICLE ASTROPHYSICS: A CENTURY OF ADVENTURES AND DISCOVERY

Dr. Stéphane Coutu
Penn State University
Department of Physics
104 Davey Laboratory, Box 241
University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
coutu@phys.psu.edu

Abstract: 2012 marks the centennial anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays by Austrian physicist Victor Hess. These high-energy messengers from the cosmos have taught us much about the fundamental constituents of the Universe and their interactions. Their continuing saga is fraught with challenges, and requires innovative detection techniques and adventurous deployments in remote corners of the globe. We take a tour through a storied, rich and active field, and highlight recent, continuing and planned efforts.
 
 
PLANETARIUM ON A SHOESTRING
2012 Armand Spitz Lecture

Dan Goins
Planetarium Director, retired
Martinsville High School
1360 E. Gray St.
Martinsville, Indiana 46151
glpa2000@comcast.net

Abstract: Having a small planetarium with no dedicated budget, it was critical to its continuation to have the assistance of the Great Lakes Planetarium members. Their ideas plus creative uses of ordinary items made it possible to create programs for students and the public. Auxiliary programs with assistance of the Indiana Astronomical Society members became an extension of the planetarium operation both for the schools and the public.
 
 
ASTRONOMY UPDATE FOR THE PLANETARIAN 2012

Dr. Ronald Kaitchuck
Ball State University Planetarium
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Ball State University
Muncie, Indiana 47306
rkaitchu@bsu.edu

Abstract: This year there was the sobering announcement of the possible closure of several well-known telescopes and the exciting plans to build telescopes far larger than any now in existence. While we still think the Earth’s moon was produced by a collision, those ideas have been fine-tuned. The Dawn spacecraft has left Vesta and is now in route to the asteroid Ceres. A comet was discovered that could put on a spectacular show in 2013. Jupiter was struck by yet another asteroid or small comet and it continues to shown activity in its cloud belts. The Curiosity Rover has begun its exploration of Mars while evidence for water on Mars was found in a meteorite. Saturn’s F-ring was seen to be struck by large snowballs. The 5th moon of Pluto was discovered and concerns have been raised about the safety of the New Horizons spacecraft. Black holes continue to draw great attention from the possibility they exist in the Orion Nebula to the detection of one eating a star. Exoplanets have been found nearby in the Alpha Centauri star system and in a binary-binary star system. Exoplanets have also been found in habitable zones and one may contain diamonds. The Kepler mission gets a 4-year extension and it discovers superflares in Sun-like stars. This year was the 25th anniversary of the supernova in the LMC. It now appears that type Ia supernovae are produced by the mergers of two white dwarf stars. This coming year we will see the beginning of the descent of an interstellar gas cloud into the Milky Way’s supermassive black hole. The Magellanic Clouds may not be satellite galaxies of the Milky Way after all. An X-ray outburst in the galaxy M83 defies explanation while a new class of exceptionally dusty early galaxies has been found. Questions have been raised about how dark matter interacts with ordinary matter. The clouds from which the first star formed may have been detected. Finally, the Hubble telescope has produced the deepest image of the universe showing galaxies just 450 million years after the Big Bang.
 
 
TRANSFER BETWEEN FORMAL AND INFORMAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS IN SCIENCE

Dr. Christian Schunn
University of Pittsburgh
Learning Research & Development Center 821
3939 OHara St,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260
schunn@pitt.edu

Abstract: Late elementary / early middle school is a critical time for young learners, including for building a relationship to science. How can an informal science learning experience like a planetarium visit contribute to sending learners down a productive, lifelong learning path with science? The Science Activation Lab, a collaboration between the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California Berkeley, has recently developed a framework called Science Learning Activation, that captures the ways in which formal or informal science learning experiences in one context can change how children engage with science in the next context. Recent studies of Science Activation with a diverse range of 6th graders found that it is associated with prior informal science learning experiences, and that it predicts whether students choose to take part in optional experiences, how engaged they are during science learning in both school and museum visits, and what they learn from those experiences.
 
 
OUR PITTSBURGH CONSTELLATION

Diane Turnshek
Department of Physics
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Ave
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213
dianeturnshek@gmail.com

Abstract: Join me on a visual tour of our bright stars in the Pittsburgh astronomy scene, some hidden gems and some first-time-in-the-sun newcomers. We do it all here, research, teaching, building the instruments, courting the public with lectures, star parties and events, and creating educational books, games, documentaries and planetarium shows (more than two dozen, stellar local organizations). After seeing ours, I’ll show you how easy it is to sketch your own town’s astronomical constellation.
 

Contributed Papers:

 
SPACE TELESCOPE EDUCATION PROGRAM RESOURCES
 
Lucy Albert
Space Telescope Science Institute
3700 San Martin Dr.
Baltimore, Maryland 21218
lalbert@stsci.edu

 
Abstract: The Space Telescope Science Institute is the home of public outreach activities for the Hubble Space Telescope. Two websites, Amazing Space and HubbleSource, work together to provide the framework for the Space Telescope Education Program, which provides free standards-based education tools for formal and informal educators.
 
 
A NEW COWLEY HALL ON THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - LA CROSSE CAMPUS

Robert Allen
University of Wisconsin – La Crosse Planetarium
Physics Department, Cowley Hall
University of Wisconsin
La Crosse, Wisconsin 54601
allen.robe@uwlax.edu

Abstract: A two-phase project will lead to a much larger and highly modernized science building on the UW – La Crosse campus.
 
 
MAKING THE SWITCH FROM BUSINESS TO PHYSICS

Nick Anderson
BGSU Planetarium
Dept. of Physics & Astronomy
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio 43403
nvander@falcon.bgsu.edu

Abstract: After two years as a business major, I switched to physics. This change forced me to adjust my study habits but also provided me with some great opportunities. I will share my experiences so far as a physics major.
 
 
YINZ ARE WELCOME IN PITTSBURGH

Buck Batson and John Curran
North Hills High School Planetarium
53 Rochester Road
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15229
buckbatson@comcast.net

Abstract: Southwestern Pennsylvania has a dialect all its own, with many colorful idioms. This paper will give you a quick tour of these idioms so that you can better enjoy your time in the Steel City!
 
 
LIPS: LIVE INTERACTIVE PLANETARIUM SYMPOSIUM

Karrie Berglund
Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.
817 Pacific Ave
Bremerton, Washington 98337
karrie@digitaliseducation.com

Mark Webb
Adler Planetarium
1300 S. Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60605
mwebb@adlerplanetarium.org

Abstract: The Live Interactive Planetarium Symposium was created with the purpose of bringing together people who are interested in sharing their ideas, experience, and best practices regarding live presentation under the dome. Interaction between the planetarium presenter and the audience has always been important, but the subject is often under-represented at planetarium conferences. LIPS was created for the purpose of raising awareness and providing a forum for planetarians to focus on the subject. LIPS was held in 2011 in Bremerton, Washington and again in 2012 in South Bend, Indiana. The third LIPS meeting will be held in 2013.
 
 
THE 2012 IPS CONFERENCE

Jeanne E. Bishop
Westlake Schools Planetarium
24525 Hilliard Road
Westlake, Ohio 44145
jeanneebishop@wowway.com

Abstract: A great IPS conference took place in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, July 22-26. This will be a PowerPoint presentation illustrating details of the conference as well as touch on the next planned IPS conference in Beijing in 2014 and the three proposals for IPS conferences in 2016: Edmonton in Canada, Toulouse in France, and Warsaw in Poland.
 
 
ICE CUBE: THE WORLD’S COOLEST TELESCOPE

Robert Bonadurer
Daniel M. Soref Planetarium
Milwaukee Public Museum
800 West Wells Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233
bonadurer@mpm.edu

Abstract: How do you unlock big secrets? Find small clues. Same thing works for the universe. To help solve large mysteries like black holes, supernovae, and dark matter, you need to discover the smallest things around — neutrinos. One of the best telescopes to do that is Ice Cube at the South Pole. Learn more about this cool scope and a new planetarium show all about it that will open in the fall of 2013!
 
 
BUILD YOUR OWN DOME

Dayle L. Brown
Pegasus Productions
6109 Tamerlane Drive
South Bend, Indiana 46614
DayleDavid@comcast.net

Abstract: Over twenty-five years later, and the requests for information on how to build your own dome are still coming in. In this paper we will recap how it was done in ’86.
 
 
IMMERSIVE EARTH: NASA MIDDLE SCHOOL EARTH SCIENCE LESSONS FOR THE PLANETARIUM

Sally Brummel
Bell Museum of Natural History
10 Church St. SE
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455
sbrummel@umn.edu

Abstract: In 2010 the Minnesota Planetarium Society (MnPS) began a NASA funded program to facilitate the development of a series of Earth Science planetarium programs and accompanying classroom lessons for use with middle school students. These programs, developed by teams comprised of a planetarium educator and classroom teacher, are designed for use in digital teaching planetariums. The program is now facilitated by the Bell Museum of Natural History, where the MnPS programming now resides.
 
 
A COMMUNITY CELEBRATES THE TRANSIT OF VENUS

Chuck Bueter
15893 Ashville Lane
Granger, Indiana 46530
bueter@nightwise.org

Abstract: Astronomy educators and enthusiasts near the Michigan-Indiana border embraced the 2012 Transit of Venus as a community celebration. Among the diverse components were a planetarium program, a treasure hunt, a lecture series, a symphony performance, a newsletter, a motor coach tour, original videos, art exhibits, historical displays, public outreach events, Sun Funnel workshops, social media initiatives, related products by small businesses, multiple observing opportunities, and a time capsule. This talk parallels the interactive prezi Transit of Venus Across the Sun at http://prezi.com/3tgyibho9g-w/transit-of-venus-across-the-sun/.
 
 
HOW DO NOVICES AND EXPERTS IDENTIFY CONSTELLATIONS?

Jean Creighton and Sandra Toro
Manfred Olson Planetarium
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
P. O. Box 413
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201
jcreight@uwm.edu

Abstract: Audiences are eager to find constellations in the planetarium. When we asked people to identify constellations on star maps, we noticed certain patterns such as if they can find the Big Dipper they are much more likely to find the North Star. We looked into these patterns more closely when we interviewed people who identified constellations on paper and in the planetarium; we saw in some cases notable differences between novices and experts. Our conclusions and suggestions will help you promote more effective constellation identification among your audience members.
 
 
SCIENCE ON THE HALF-SPHERE: FULL-DOME MATERIALS FOR PLANETARIA

Patrick R. Durrell (Youngstown State University), Pamela Gay (SIUE). John Feldmeier (YSU),
Curt Spivey (YSU), Annie Wilson (YSU), Chris Karlic (YSU), and Christopher Mihos (CWRU)
Dept. of Physics & Astronomy
Youngstown State University
One University Plaza
Youngstown, Ohio 44555
prdurrell@ysu.edu

Abstract: Science on the Half Sphere (SHS) is a new collaboration led by Ward Beecher Planetarium within CosmoQuest. SHS will provide free full-dome astronomical content, including complete shows, for use in digital theatres. CosmoQuest is a virtual research and education facility designed to enable professional-public science collaboration. The SHS program will extend the reach of the Ward Beecher Planetarium’s content to new, global audiences. I will present trailers for the first two releases (debuting online in Q4 2012); Cosmic Castaways, a 22-minute narrated full-dome show outlining the search for stars between the galaxies, and a series of full-dome stills and time-lapses from the summit of Mauna Kea, including scenes of the many large telescopes. Both of these projects were funded through grants from the National Science Foundation, and will be available later in 2012 and into early 2013.
 
 
DIGITAL PLANETARIA ALLIANCES: CAPITALIZING ON INTERACTIVE VISUALIZATION AND LEARNING

Joel Halvorson
Minnesota Regional Planetarium Network
300 Nicollet Mall, Room 270
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401
halvor@boreal.org

Abstract: How can we turn our domes into virtual environments to help students infer knowledge? How do we build learning environments and curriculum that capitalize on this potential? Whether it’s a tour of the universe or a trip through the human heart, there are a growing numbers of datasets and interactive tools that are finding a way into digital planetariums. In the Upper Midwest a group of planetarium educators with interoperable system have come together to share cost and tackle these questions.
 
 
GLPA WEB SITE UPDATE

Geoff Holt
MMSD Planetarium
201 S Gammon Rd.
Madison, Wisconsin 53717
gholt@madison.k12.wi.us

Abstract: Highlights of the current web site will be presented, including recent additions, and previews of features we are hoping to add in the future. Contribute your feedback to help us to maximize this networking tool.
 
 
AS VIEWED FROM EARTH

David W. Hurd
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
169 Cooper Hall
Edinboro, Pennsylvania 16444
dhurd@edinboro.edu

Abstract: Misconceptions abound about how planets orbit the Sun, as viewed from Earth. The use of Stellarium provides a simple tool to help learners both clarify orbital paths and understand conjunctions. This paper provides step-by-step instructions on how to deliver a lesson for inferior planets with regards to orbital dynamics.
 
 
CONVINCING THE PUBLIC OF THE IMPORTANCE OF SPACECRAFT
 

Francine Jackson

URI Planetarium

P. O. Box 353

University of Rhode Island

Providence, Rhode Island 02901

 

Abstract: With the summer’s Curiosity and RBSP launches, I’ve been hearing about the waste of money these “things” are.  We’ve got to show their relevance.

 

 

LOSSLESS, DIGITAL SIMULATED SURROUND MUSIC AND SOUND EFFECTS AT THE TOUCH OF A DIMMABLE RED BUTTON
 
Chris Janssen
Wausau School District Planetarium
1200 West Wausau Avenue
Wausau, Wisconsin 54401
cmjanssen@yahoo.com
 
Abstract: Tech level 3-4 of 5.  Audio is critical to engaging and motivating our audiences.  Quality and timing can make all the difference.  If the mood changes, you need to make the audio adapt.  Ever have a group that's just little TOO excited and talkative?  Slow the music down a little.  Exit music needs to excite and inspire, have a  playlist ready to go.  Using free software, an old PC, some Radio Shack parts, and optional surround  audio card you can make your own theater audio station with: Superior Lossless audio codec, 5.1 simulated surround from stereo tracks, Track volume normalization, (non-destructive) Adjustable duration song crossfade (no more dead spots), Layered sound effects (like crickets), and No monitor glow by using an optional red LED button box (free specs, you build).
 
 
BUT WAIT, THERE'S MORE: CREATING A "PACKAGE-DEAL" WITH A FULL-DOME SHOW
 
Deb Lawson
The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis
3000 North Meridian St
Indianapolis, Indiana  46208
debl@childrenmsnuseum.org
 
Abstract: The Children's Museum of Indianapolis developed and launched "Flight Adventures", the first full-dome show. The show and great connected content—programs, activities, interactives, displays, web content—were produced by a skilled team, based on common goals and objectives.  A virtual "package deal", the show will be described, with a focus on the associated content, giving visitors and school groups a variety of companion museum attractions and follow-up to keep interest and ROI going strong.
 
 
NATIVE SKYWATCHERS—OJIBWE AND D(L)AKOTA STAR MAPS
 
Annette S. Lee
Assistant Professor of Astronomy & Physics
St. Cloud State University
314 Wick Science Building
720 Fourth Ave. S, St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301
aslee@stcloudstate.edu
 
Abstract: The Native Skywatchers programming addresses the crisis of preventing the loss of Ojibwe and D(L)akota star knowledge.  It is critical to preserve and foster the culture and language.  Elders are passing.   Sadly other elders simply do not remember the star stories.  Interwoven in the language is keen insight and observation far beyond what people practice today. • In addition, Minnesota State Science Standards K-12 require teaching  "Understanding that men and women throughout the history of all cultures, including Minnesota American Indian tribes and communities, have been involved in engineering design and scientific inquiry .... For example Ojibwe and Dakota knowledge and use of patterns in the stars to predict and plan. . .," And yet there is a complete void of materials. • Presented here are the maps we created:  Ojibwe Giizhig Anung Masinaaigan - Ojibwe Sky Star Map and the D(L)akota Makoçe Wiçaå®pi Wowapi - D(L)akota Sky Star Map.  Astronomically accurate, aesthetically stunning, researched, painted, and designed by Native Skywatchers team members.  This interdisciplinary project includes professional astronomers, professional artists, language and cultural experts and educators, all native.  We aim to build community around the native star knowledge. • Distributed at the NASA-MN Space Grant funded Native Skywatchers Middle School Teacher Workshop June 2012, these maps have been incredibly well received.  The need for this knowledge is urgent.
 
 
THE LOSS OF PERFECTION
 
Adam Leis
BGSU Planetarium
P. O. Box 164
Portage, Ohio 43451
adam.m.leis@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Long ago, celestial objects were thought of as perfect objects, representative of the divine. Over time, the heavenly bodies were found to be imperfect and flawed. As knowledge became more common, perceptions of what were perfect and divine changed. This paper will discuss that evolution of perception.
 
 
DESIGNING A BLENDER COURSE
 
Kenneth L. Murphy
Southwest Minnesota State University Planetarium
1501 State Street
Marshall, Minnesota 56258
ken.murphy@smsu.edu
 
Abstract: Blender is a free, open-source software program that allows users to create and animate 3D models.  The uses of Blender are endless and can span areas from art to science to the creation of planetarium shows.  At SMSU a 1-credit course was created to teach Blender to the general student body population.  This talk discusses how the course was structured and implemented.
 
 
A CANTICLE EXPERIENCE: FULL DOME IMMERSIVE—WITHOUT FULL DOME VIDEO!
 
Alan V. Pareis
Edwin Clark Schouweiler Memorial Planetarium
University of Saint Francis
2707 Spring Street
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46808
bellerophonii@aol.com
 
Abstract: A “mostly automated” traditional optomechanical planetarium (9.1m) combined star machine, eleven virtual screens, video, and BlissLights to create an engaging immersive experience.
 
 
INTEGRATING SCIENCE, THE ARTS, AND HUMANITIES:
SONGS IN THE KEY OF EARTH—THE ONLY PLANET WITH LOVE

Patricia Shih
Shih Enterprises, Inc.
P. O. Box 1554
Huntington, New York 11743
patricia@patriciashih.com
www.patriciashih.com

Abstract: How does a planetarium attract a wider audience: those who might not be particularly interested in science or astronomy? How does one cast the broadest possible net to all ages, families and hard-to-reach public audiences? What is a tried-and-true, effective “hook and bait”? One answer is: the arts. By integrating live interactive music, visuals and the magic of the planetarium you can appeal to the widest possible demographic and to all ages, from pre-schoolers through seniors. Everyone—especially children—loves music. It’s the universal language, a can-opener for the mind. Add the live, spontaneous interactive element and you’ve got a winner.
 
 
GIVE ME A LIVE PROGRAM!

Dale W. Smith
BGSU Planetarium
Dept. of Physics & Astronomy
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio 43403
dsmith@newton.bgsu.edu

Abstract: An unusually large fraction of school groups this year have requested live rather than prerecorded programs. I will describe some of our live programs and some of the facets of live programs that may make them attractive to teachers.
 
 

Workshops:

 
HALLOWEEN ASTRONOMY

Karrie Berglund
Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.
817 Pacific Avenue
Bremerton, Washington 98337
karrie@DigitalisEducation.com

Abstract: This workshop is a presentation of Digitalis’ free lesson plan by the same name. It explores the the history and mythology of Halloween and its relationship with solstices and equinoxes. It is written for use in a portable dome, allowing time for entry and exit. This and all other Digitalis lesson plans can be downloaded free of charge from: http://DigitalisEducation.com/curricula.html.
 
 
MULTI-WAVELENGTH STORIES FROM THE ENDS OF THE EARTH

Lindsey Bleem, Abigail Crites, Jen Helsby
Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics
University of Chicago
5640 South Ellis Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60637
bleeml@uchicago.edu
acrites@uchicago.edu
jhelsby@oddjob.uchicago.edu

Abstract: Scientists today seek to answer fundamental questions about the Universe such as: Did inflation happen? What is Dark Energy? Is there a fourth neutrino, and, if so, what is it like? Tackling these complex problems requires just about the entire toolbox. In this workshop we explore how to craft narratives about solving these puzzles by combining measurements from across the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., radio, infrared, optical, and x-ray observations). We will highlight research that involves the South Pole Telescope, a 10-meter millimeter-wavelength telescope situated at the Geographic South Pole. In particular we will discuss research projects such as mapping the distribution of mass through time and using galaxy clusters as probes of Dark Energy. By providing you with the necessary information, tools, visual resources, and the opportunity to develop your own public-friendly narratives, this workshop will help you to bring research from the ends of the Earth to your home institution.
 
 
DEVELOPMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS: IMPLICATIONS FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Susan Reynolds Button
Quarks to Clusters
8793 Horseshoe Lane
Chittenango, New York 13037
sbuttonq2c@gmail.com

Abstract: Becoming well versed in the developmental characteristics of learners that you work with is critical; it will enhance your power as a presenter. If you address these characteristics when writing lesson plans and include experiential learning principles your programs will be more effective and entertaining for everyone.
 
 
INTRODUCTION TO PRODUCTION WITH FREE SOFTWARE

Waylena McCully
Staerkel Planetarium
Parkland College
2400 West Bradley Avenue
Champaign, Illinois 61821
wmccully@parkland.edu

Dan Tell
Morrison Planetarium
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive
San Francisco, California 94118
dtell@calacademy.org

Chris Janssen
Wausau School District Planetarium
1200 West Wausau Drive
Wausau, Wisconsin 54401
cmjanssen@yahoo.com

Abstract: This is a workshop to teach beginners how to use free software programs to produce content for planetarium theaters. While the focus will be on using the free and open source software package Blender for 3D image production and video animation, other free programs will also be introduced. These techniques should prove useful for both conventional planetariums and those who have upgraded to fulldome.
 
 
THE NEXT GENERATION OF SCIENCE STANDARDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PLANETARIUM

Gary Sampson
Gary E. Sampson Planetarium
880 Hi Ridge Avenue
Waukesha, Wisconsin 53186
sampsoga@gmail.com

David DeRemer
Charles Horwitz Planetarium
S14 W28167 Madison Street
Waukesha Wisconsin 53188
dderemer@waukesha.k12.wi.us

Geoff Holt
MMSD Planetarium
201 S Gammon Rd
Madison, Wisconsin 53717
gholt@madison.k12.wi.us

Abstract: This workshop was developed to explore how the Next Generation of Science Standards (NGSS) could be integrated into planetarium programming at the K-12 levels. After a review of past and current national science standards, breakout groups were organized for the elementary, middle school, and high school levels. Participants studied draft versions of the NGSS and the group facilitators gave examples of how these Standards can be integrated into current planetarium programs. Suggestions are given for a future NGSS workshop to follow up on the present one.
 
 
INTERACTING WITH YOUR AUDIENCE USING A MODULE PLANETARIUM PROGRAM

Kim Small
Sandy Run Middle School
Upper Dublin School District
520 Twining Road
Dresher, Pennsylvania 19025
ksmall@udsd.org

Abstract: Bring back (or enrich) discussion, live teaching, and interaction in the planetarium experiences you provide your audiences! This workshop will demonstrate an example of how to incorporate live interactive planetarium teaching with a planetarium program that has been designed in a modular nature. The module program that will be utilized targets grades K through 2 and focuses on observations of the Moon. The workshop will demonstrate live interaction lessons that could be used in between the prerecorded modules of the program described above or as stand-alone lessons. Further, additional related hands-on activities will be demonstrated and discussed to round out a complete learning experience on lunar observations for early elementary students.
 
 
3D MODELING

Dan Tell
Morrison Planetarium
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive
San Francisco, California 94118
dtell@calacademy.org

Waylena McCully
Staerkel Planetarium
Parkland College
2400 West Bradley Avenue
Champaign, Illinois 61821
wmccully@parkland.edu

Chris Janssen
Wausau School District Planetarium
1200 West Wausau Drive
Wausau, Wisconsin 54401
cmjanssen@yahoo.com

Abstract: Make a 3D rocket ship! This workshop is for planetarians with previous experience working in Blender, a free and open source 3D graphics application. Participants will review basic modeling techniques and learn more advanced tips and techniques as they construct a 3D rocket ship, ready for texturing and modeling.
 
 
LESSONS FOR LIVE INTERACTION WITH STUDENTS BEFORE THE PLANETARIUM SHOW

Gene Zajac and Bryan Child
Shaker Heights High School Planetarium
15911 Aldersyde Drive
Shaker Heights, Ohio 44120
zajac_g@shaker.org
child_b@shaker.org

Abstract: We have activities with the students before we go under the dome. They often involve props and always include discussion. The times vary from 15 to 20 minutes. This helps give students and teachers ideas and concepts that will be further explained when we go under the night sky of the planetarium. The ideas for each lesson came from teachers and the State of Ohio teaching guidelines. The lessons are easily modified to be used at other grade levels.
 
 

Posters:

 
EXOPLANETS EXPLORATION

Cheri Adams
Boonshoft Museum of Discovery
2600 DeWeese Parkway
Dayton, Ohio 45414
cadams@boonshoftmuseum.org

Abstract: The Boonshoft Museum of Discovery’s astronomy wing renovation continues with the planning of a new exoplanet exhibit, Exoplanets Exploration. The exhibit will provide a sound STEM base for the target audience to explore exoplanet discoveries, to gain the science knowledge necessary to have a basic understanding of exoplanet missions and instruments utilized, make learning about exoplanets accessible by providing interactive exhibit components, and to challenge visitors to contemplate the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe. The new exhibit is funded by a NASA CP4SMP grant.
 
 
SOME DETAILS OF THE 2016 IPS CONFERENCE PROPOSALS

Jeanne E. Bishop
Westlake Schools Planetarium
24525 Hilliard Road
Westlake, Ohio 44145
jeannebishop@wowway.com

Abstract: Three fine proposals have been made for the IPS conference that will take place in 2016, the biennial conference following IPS 2014 in Beijing. Some details of each of the proposals will appear here: for Edmonton, Alberta; for Toulouse, France; and for Warsaw/Krakow, Poland. Small cards available at this poster will permit GLPA delegates to express concerns and wishes relating to the 2016 conference site.
 
 
TRANSIT OF VENUS TIME KEG

Chuck Bueter
15893 Ashville Ln.
Granger, Indiana 46530
bueter@nightwise.org

Abstract: In past centuries, observers of transits of Venus have written messages for future witnesses of the celestial phenomenon. During and after the 2012 transit of Venus, spectators reflected on and shared their experience for their 22nd century counterparts. The written personal records and other transit of Venus artifacts from 2004 and 2012 will be sealed in the Transit of Venus Time Keg, a stainless steel time capsule made from a beer keg. Great Lakes Planetarium Association (GLPA) members can contribute their messages at the GLPA 2012 Annual Conference in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where the Transit of Venus Time Keg will be sealed, bringing closure, literally, to this popular and historically significant solar system alignment. A commemorative plaque celebrates nature’s celestial spectacles, and invites people to open the Time Keg after 100 years as the 2117 and 2125 transits of Venus approach.
 
 
ENVISION VENUS

April Whitt
Fernbank Science Center
156 Heaton Park Drive NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30307
april.whitt@fernbank.edu

Abstract: Partnering with a local university, Fernbank Science Center offered a teacher workshop for collaboration among music, science, and art teachers. Participants learned kinesthetic teaching tools, studied moon phases, and extended that knowledge to the June 5 transit of Venus.