GLPA Conference Proceedings: 2014

 

GLPA Members:  You can download these Proceedings using the following link. Note that you must be logged in to download the PDF file.
 
2014 Proceedings PDF:
 
 
Non-members:  You can order a PDF of this Proceeding ($3) or the entire Proceedings CD ($4) through the online store. They can also be purchased through the mail using the order form.
 

Here are the titles and abstracts for the Invited Speakers, Contributed Papers, Posters, and Workshops offered during the 2014 GLPA Conference:

 

Invited Speakers:

 
ASTRONOMY UPDATE FOR THE PLANETARIAN: 2014
Ronald Kaitchuck 
Professor of Physics & Astronomy
Planetarium Director
Ball State University
Muncie, Indiana 47306
 
Abstract: The pace of discovery continues to be fast. This year a new class of exoplanet was recognized, we have the first good estimate of the number of habitable Earth-like planets in the Milky Way, discoveries of asteroids with rings and tails, the first landing of a space probe on a comet, the suggestion of another planet in our solar system, further evidence that Mars once had an environment conducive for life, changes in the oceans of Titan, the first portrait of a brown dwarf star, the determination of the dimmest and coolest true star, and an exciting, but possibly a false alarm, discovery for cosmologists.
 
 
ADVENTURES IN SCIENCE: BUILDING A 30 M TELESCOPE
Catherine A. Pilachowski
Department of Astronomy SW 319
Indiana University Bloomington
727 E 3rd Street
Bloomington, Indiana 47405
 
Abstract: Astronomers are planning a new generation of ground-based telescopes, building on the heritage of the 8-10 meter telescopes constructed in the last 25 years. Bigger telescopes allow astronomers to study fainter and more distant objects and to see the universe in ever-finer detail. The next generation of telescopes planned for operation in the next decade will enable us to study the first stars formed in the universe, to explore the atmospheres and properties of planets around other stars, and to discover new phenomena in the time domain. The technical challenges of building and operating such huge telescopes are daunting, and these new behemoths with diameters of 20-40 meters will push the limits of technology on several frontiers.
 
 
LEAVING A LEGACY—ARMAND SPITZ’S LEGACY—OUR LEGACY
2014 Armand Spitz Lecture
Sheldon Schafer
Planetarium Director Emeritus
Peoria Riverfront Museum
222 SW Washington
Peoria, Illinois 61602
 
Abstract: Armand Spitz’s legacy in the planetarium field is considerable, and well known. We are all part of his legacy. Each of us is, in turn, leaving a legacy to the field, influenced by Armand Spitz and our many colleagues, each with our personal imprint. In reflecting on my 44 years in the field, I find that to be true for me as well. 
 
 
HOW MUCH LOUDER DO I NEED TO TURN UP THE SOUNDTRACK BEFORE THEY LEARN?: A COGNITIVE SCIENCE PERSPECTIVE ON MEMORY IN THE PLANETARIUM
Timothy F. Slater
University of Wyoming & CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research Laramie, Wyoming 82071
timslaterwyo@gmail.com 
 
Abstract: Recent research in the cognitive learning sciences demonstrates that no matter how precisely phrased, how cleverly illustrated, or how captivating the story, many of our students fail to understand the astronomical concepts we are trying to teach. In contrast, we see that learners better internalize concepts when emotionally connected to themselves and repeatedly illustrated in varying contexts. 
 
 
Contributed Papers:
 
EXOPLANETS EXPLORATION 
Cheri Adams 
Boonshoft Museum of Discovery
2600 DeWeese Parkway
Dayton, Ohio 45414
cadams@boonshoftmuseum.org 
 
Abstract: Our new exoplanet exhibition, Exoplanets Exploration, will have opened just shortly before the 2014 GLPA Fall Conference. Many of our guests will be introduced for the first time to exoplanets through the numerous interactive components of the exhibition. The primary goals of Exoplanets Exploration are to educate participants about the discovery of exoplanets, the science necessary for their discovery, and the methods used in the search missions of exoplanets. The exhibition is located in the existing astronomy wing, the Hall of the Universe, and was funded by a NASA Competitive Program for Science Museums and Planetariums (CP4SMP) grant. 
 
 
NEW COWLEY HALL OF SCIENCE UPDATE
Robert Allen
University of Wisconsin–La Crosse Planetarium
Physics Department, Cowley Hall
University of Wisconsin—La Crosse
La Crosse, Wisconsin 54601
allen.robe@uwlax.edu
 
Abstract: Planning is well underway for a new Science building on the University of Wisconsin—La Crosse campus. Stage 1 is scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2018. The Planetarium will be in Phase 2, which is tentatively scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2020. 
 
 
OBSERVATION VIA RENOVATION 
Nicholas Anderson 
Lake Erie Nature & Science Center
28728 Wolf Road
Bay Village, Ohio 44140
nicka@lensc.org 
 
Abstract: I will share my experience at the 2013 Spitz Summer Institute and what I have learned from working in a newly renovated planetarium. 
 
 
THE SMALL PLANETARIUM GIFT SHOPS
W. Brayton Batson 
North Hills High School Planetarium
53 Rochester Road
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15229
buckbatson@comcast.net 
 
Abstract: The students of the Astronomy Club at North Hills High School decided this past year to operate a gift shop as part of their fundraising activities. Since we have no permanent display area, the students had to come up with a shop that could be set up, operated, broken down, and stored easily and quickly. Take a look at what we did! 
 
 
2014 IPS BEIJING CONFERENCE REPORT
Jeanne E. Bishop
Westlake Schools Planetarium
24525 Hilliard Road
Westlake, Ohio 44145
jeanneebishop@wowway.com 
 
Abstract: With many photographs from the 2014 IPS Beijing conference, I will discuss the interesting and diverse aspects of the venues, presentations, and special tours offered at this first conference on mainland Asia. As GLPA’s IPS Representative, I also will share news of some important IPS activities including future conferences, committees, and elections.
 
 
CREATE = CREATING RELEVANT EDUCATION IN ASTRONOMY THROUGH EXPERIENCE
Robert Bonadurer
Milwaukee Public Museum
800 West Wells Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233
bonadurer@mpm.edu 
 
Abstract: CREATE = Creating Relevant Astronomy Education through Experience. It is a NASA funded after school education program that immerses high school students in astronomy and then allows them to create a planetarium show. The first group has completed their projects. The second group starts this fall. The planetarium show they’re creating has begun production. By October 2015, the entire show will be completed. See their results! 
 
 
UPDATE ON THE (MC)2 SCIENCE COLLABORATIVE
Ann Bragg 
Marietta College
215 Fifth Street
Marietta, Ohio 45750
ann.bragg@marietta.edu 
 
Abstract: For the past five years, I have been involved in a collaboration between Marietta College and Marietta City Schools. The goal of the collaboration is to provide opportunities for all K-5 classes within the district to visit campus and/or receive a visit from a College faculty member in order to engage in activities aligned with Ohio’s Academic Content Standards in the sciences. I will discuss the work of the collaboration to date, focusing on expansions and changes to the program since I last spoke about this at the 2011 GLPA meeting. 
 
 
LEARNING HOW TO USE JAVASCRIPT WITH DIGISTAR 5 
Joe Childers 
Boonshoft Museum of Discovery
2600 DeWeese Pkwy
Dayton, Ohio 45414
jchilders@boonshoftmuseum.org 
 
Abstract: This past summer and fall I’ve been learning how to use the JavaScript plug-in that comes with Digistar 5. This paper will give an overview of the capabilities JavaScript adds the native Digistar scripting language. Loops, conditionals, variables and calculations are all present and easy to use. JavaScript also provides new features such as callbacks and multi-threading which enable powerful capabilities for Digistar for both educational and dramatic effect. 
 
 
AWESOME ADVENTURE IN THE STRATOSPHERE ABOARD SOFIA 
Jean Creighton 
UWM Manfred Olson Planetarium
P. O. Box 413
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201
jcreight@uwm.edu
 
Abstract: NASA selected me to be one of the 24 Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors who flew on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) during Spring 2014. I will share with you the highlights from being on board the largest moving astronomical observatory in the world at 45,000 feet.
 
 
FROM CONCEPT TO SCREEN: A DECONSTRUCTION OF A FULLDOME PROMO 
Michael Daut
Evans & Sutherland
770 Komas Drive
Salt Lake City, Utah 84108
mdaut@es.com 
 
Abstract: In 2014, we produced a fulldome piece to demonstrate the capabilities of the latest update to our Digistar 5 system. In this candid behind-the-scenes look at the making of this promo, you‘ll get a detailed and often comical look at the (often maddening, often elusive) creative process that went into choosing a concept, writing a script, visualizing the story, shooting live-action, creating animations, and delivering a promo that satisfied both the internal team and the intended audience. 
 
 
THE IPS AND GLPA 
Jon W. Elvert 
Pennington Planetarium/LASM
100 River Road
South Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70821
jelvert@lasm.org 
 
Abstract: The International Planetarium Society (IPS) has launched an initiative that will help guide IPS in the decade ahead and we need GLPA’s help. This presentation will outline the Vision 2020 initiative: its planning process to include and collaborate with all planetarium related interests, foster interdisciplinary connections with science, astronomy and art, and how the results will benefit GLPA members. 
 
 
REST WITH MUSIC 
John French 
Abrams Planetarium
Michigan State University
755 Science Road
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
frenchj@msu.edu 
 
Abstract: The Abrams Planetarium in conjunction with Michigan State University’s Health-4U department started a new program to help faculty and staff relax and improve emotional wellness. The program is called Rest with Music. It incorporates live music and relaxing planetarium imagery. 
 
 
TELESCOPE LOAN PROGRAM 
Geoff Holt 
Madison Metropolitan School District Planetarium
201 South Gammon Road
Madison, Wisconsin 53717
gholt@madison.k12.wi.us 
 
Abstract: Our planetarium serves our school district, other area schools, and the community. Over the past few years, we’ve developed a telescope loan program that has become very popular and well utilized. The program has also been personally rewarding to run. This paper will present the details of our program and what we’ve learned over the past few years of telescope loans. 
 
 
THE TRAIN WRECK THAT CHANGED TIME 
Francine Jackson 
University of Rhode Island Planetarium
P. O. Box 353
University of Rhode Island
Providence, Rhode Island 02901
Francine_Jackson@brown.edu 
 
Abstract: Sometimes history can occur right in your backyard. In 1853, a railroad accident in my neighborhood led to the time standards we have today.
 
 
SPACESHIP BRIDGE SIMULATOR CREATES COOPERATIVE ASYMMETRIC PROBLEM SOLVING IN THE DOME
Chris Janssen
Wausau School District Planetarium
1200 West Wausau Avenue
Wausau, Wisconsin 54401
cjanssen@wausauschools.org
 
Abstract: Artemis is a software title that simulates a spaceship bridge complete with Captain, Helmsman, Weapons, Science, Engineering and Communications officers. Learn: how you can implement this in our dome, how we could connect up to a fleet of 8 ships (theaters) together on large missions, how to get students creating missions with current NASA exoplanet data, and how to make this a fund raiser event.
 
 
CROSS PROMOTION IN YOUR DOME: CONNECTING WITH OTHER MUSEUM PROGRAMMING
Renae S. Kerrigan
Peoria Riverfront Museum
222 SW Washington St.
Peoria, Illinois 61603
rkerrigan@peoriariverfrontmuseum.org
 
Abstract: The planetarium staff at the Peoria Riverfront Museum has been challenged to better connect with special exhibitions and programs. We do not have the budget to buy a new show to complement each changing exhibition, so we have focused on creating live, interactive shows using Uniview, our Zeiss star projector, and PowerPoint. We have found that even though these shows are not always as visually stunning as some fulldome shows, they receive an equal or better reception than our pre-made shows.
 
 
THINKING OUTSIDE THE DOME
Gary Lazich
Adler Planetarium and Astronomical Museum
1300 South Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60605
glazich@comcast.net
 
Abstract: A debate continues to rage on Dome-L over the relative merits and demerits of optical-mechanical projection against full-dome projection. Actually, these media have far more similarities than differences in that both involve projection to a relatively passive audience. POPS and LIPS have made great strides in employing interactive participation in planetarium programs yet appear to work best only with small audiences. Beginning several years ago, Adler Planetarium began designing and implementing floor programs to be presented by paid Mission Specialists and volunteer Floor Program Facilitators. At first, these programs took the form of more passive demonstrations to planetarium visitors. They have evolved into science experiments performed with visitors as they discover science in a way discouraged by larger, more media-intensive dome theater programs.
 
 
GLPA.ORG WEBSITE REDESIGN
Adam Leis
Alumnus
BGSU Planetarium
224 B Killarney Circle
Bowling Green, Ohio 43402
adam.m.leis@gmail.com
 
Abstract: The web is a rapidly developing and changing environment. Access to the Internet has rapidly grown as well, and the number of devices surfing the web is staggering. In a time when devices are exploding with variety, technologies must adapt and prepare for the surplus of visitors. We will discuss the current needs and complications of the GLPA website, and the direction of change in which it will proceed. A fully-responsive website that agnostically adapts to your device: the future is here!
 
 
CALLING THE ISS: THE AMATEUR RADIO INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION PROGRAM
Mitch Luman
Evansville Museum of Arts, History, and Science
P. O. Box 3435
Evansville, Indiana 47733 
mluman@emuseum.org
 
Abstract: The Amateur Radio International Space Station program is a cooperative venture of NASA and other involved groups that organizes scheduled contacts via Amateur Radio between astronauts aboard the International Space Station and students. With the assistance of area Amateur Radio volunteers, our planetarium hosted an event where students from a local school spoke directly with an astronaut for nine minutes during a planned pass over our community.
 
 
SEPA’S THE PLANETS: THE SCHOUWEILER’S FULL DOME IMMERSIVE WITHOUT FULL DOME VIDEO
Alan V. Pareis
Edwin Clark Schouweiler Memorial Planetarium
University of Saint Francis
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46808
bellerophonii@aol.com
 
Chris A. Highlen
Edwin Clark Schouweiler Memorial Planetarium
University of Saint Francis
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46808
 
Abstract: To provide support, and perhaps inspiration, for the staff of facilities with aging technology similar to ours. 
 
Editor’s Note: Sadly, Chris Highlen passed away in October 2014 while this paper was in preparation. As Technician at the Schouweiler, he was a major contributor to the work described in this paper.
 
 
SPHERICAL VIDEO: YOU HAVE THE POWER
Jason Fletcher
David Rabkin
Charles Hayden Planetarium
Museum of Science
1 Science Park
Boston, Massachusetts 02114-1099
jfletcher@mos.org, drabkin@mos.org
 
Abstract: The Museum of Science, Boston’s Charles Hayden Planetarium team has become skilled at creating remarkably high-quality spherical video at or above 4K Domemaster resolution. And we are doing it at a remarkably low cost—about $5K for the video equipment. This paper will explain how you can create and use spherical video, as well as the equipment and software you’ll need. Right now we’re using spherical video only to create scenes for a new recorded planetarium show. But we think it has a place in live, presenter-led programs, too.
 
 
TEACHING ASTRONOMY UNDER THE DOME
Martin Ratcliffe
Sky-Skan, Inc & Wichita State University
c/o 946 Parkway Drive
Valley Center, Kansas 67147
ratcliffe@skyskan.com
 
Abstract: Digital planetarium systems are maturing in their second decade of use. We look at the unique opportunities for teaching astronomy using your digital theater. We review a few features of our solar system and galaxy to convey some of their fundamental properties and in doing so lay the groundwork for conceptual learning under the dome. Topics range from simple visual examples to convey the universal force of gravity that convey a common origin for a system, to viewing the evolutionary history of the universe in color. Examples shown can be used on most digital planetarium systems.
 
 
GRANT-WRITING AND USING THE “MYSTIQUE” OF THE PLANETARIUM TO YOUR ADVANTAGE
Mark S. Reed
Peter F. Hurst Planetarium
c/o Jackson High School
544 Wildwood Avenue
Jackson, Michigan 49201
marksreed@aol.com 
 
Abstract: Grant-writing is an effective method of raising funds in an age where institutional dollars are limited. Funding is especially important during a transition from old planetarium technologies to a digital system. Within this paper, I will share how the “mystique” of a planetarium—when used in combination with passion, vision, and phrasing—have helped me write a number of winning proposals for my facility.
 
 
DESTINATION SOLAR SYSTEM: NOW BOARDING
Mike Smail
Adler Planetarium
1300 South Lake Shore Dr
Chicago, Illinois 60605
msmail@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: The Adler’s latest fulldome production, Destination Solar System, opened to the public in May of 2014. Come along and learn about the production process, our collaborative partners, time travel, and much much more!
 
 
RENOVATION AT BOWLING GREEN
Dale W. Smith
BGSU Planetarium
Dept. of Physics & Astronomy
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio 43403
dsmith@newton.bgsu.edu
 
Abstract: We recently installed a cove-mounted Spitz SciDome XD full-dome video system at the BGSU Planetarium. We kept our classic Minolta star projector and Omni-Q slide automation system. This paper describes the renovation process and how we are using the new system.
 
 
EXPLORING MARS FROM AN URBAN ARTS AND MEDIA COLLEGE
Jim Sweitzer
Department of Science and Mathematics, Room 500
Columbia College
623 South Wabash
Chicago, Illinois 60605
jsweitzer@colum.edu
 
Abstract: In the past year, I have been using NASA’s Mars Student Imaging Program with both my undergraduate astrobiology course, but also with Chicago high school students in our after school program called Junior Research Scientists. Teaching students by doing imaging research with real Mars orbiter data has gone very well. We have discovered a new cave on Mars, secured a job at NASA Houston for a journalism major, and more. This research using big-data from NASA can make a great complement to other planetarium programming. In this talk I will share a video of unscripted high school students explaining the experience.
 
 
MAPPING THE PLANETS: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND HIGH RESOLUTION MAPS IN THE DOME
Dan Tell
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive
San Francisco, California 94118
dtell@calacademy.org
 
Abstract: With tremendous increase in computing power and availability of Internet delivery of high resolution map data, dome theaters are able to visit the planets in unprecedented fidelity and realism. Over the past several years, the Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences has been engaged in major utilization and experiments with map data: including roving the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and other worlds; georeferencing and exploring the work of professional researchers and citizen scientists; and building a personal, dynamic understanding of our changing planet. GIS data and tools have become a major part of the Morrison’s programming, and are bringing a new dimension to our programming, both looking down to Earth and up to the worlds beyond.
 
 
CREATING A PUBLIC PROGRAMMING KIOSK
Adam Thanz
Bays Mountain Planetarium
853 Bays Mountain Park Road
Kingsport, Tennessee 37660
thanz@kingsporttn.gov
 
Abstract: For years, we’ve wanted to create a vibrant and clearly readable display that lets our public visitors easily know what public programming was offered for that day. We also wanted to promote programming and special events that were offered on other days. To remedy this need with low cost and high visual quality, we have done so using a Mac Mini, Keynote software, and a large, HD monitor. Find out how we did it and see the results for yourself.
 
 
HAPTICS AND INFORMAL SCIENCE EDUCATION COMMUNICATION: TOUCH AND PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT
Krista Briana Thompson
Adler Planetarium
1300 S Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60605
KristaBrianaThompson@gmail.com
 
Abstract: The use of physical objects to aid in the communication of scientific concepts can be seen at most informal science education institutions. The Adler Planetarium incorporates multiple physical objects into their facilitated “activity cart” programs. A pilot study has been designed to evaluate the relationship, if any, between physical touch and public engagement in these programs. Observational data will be collected from public interaction with three “activity carts” that utilize varying levels of haptic stimulation. The results of this study will determine if touch-focused methods of communication in the informal science education arena merits further research.
 
 
ATLANTA SCIENCE FESTIVAL
April S. Whitt
Fernbank Science Center
156 Heaton Park Drive NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30307
april.whitt@fernbank.edu
 
Abstract: Atlanta hosted its first-ever Science Festival in March 2014. Fernbank Science Center offered activities, planetarium programs, and a mystery-theater presentation: Death by Chocolate. The experience was popular, and planning is underway for the next Festival in March 2015.
 
 
Posters:
 
TALE OF A COMET
Chuck Bueter
15893 Ashville Lane
Granger, Indiana 46530
bueter@nightwise.org
 
Abstract: Anticipating a potential celestial spectacle, our community celebrated the unique sungrazing Comet ISON with all-school assemblies, art exhibits, music events, guest speakers, planetarium shows, a scavenger hunt, viewing with telescopes, social media, lots of dry ice comets, and more. The South Bend Community School Corporation embraced the comet‘s approach yet recognized science doesn‘t have preordained outcomes and that the comet may not survive perihelion. Details at www.cometfestival.com.
 
 
SPHERICAL VIDEO: WHAT CAN IT DO FOR PRESENTER-LED PROGRAMS
David Rabkin
Charles Hayden Planetarium
Museum of Science
1 Science Park
Boston, Massachusetts 02114-1099
drabkin@mos.org
 
Abstract: The Museum of Science, Boston’s Charles Hayden Planetarium team has become skilled at creating remarkably high-quality spherical video at or above 4K resolution. And we are doing it at a remarkably low cost—about $5K for the video equipment. So far, we have used it only to create scenes for a recorded show slated for release this winter. We intend to explore the use of spherical video as a tool to support presenter-led shows in the planetarium. This poster session will briefly review the basics of spherical video presented in a paper earlier in the conference and then advance to creative exploration of how this exciting and powerful visual tool might be used in support of live, presenter-led shows and activities. I hope this session is the start of building a community who experiment, collaborate, and perhaps develop a workshop in a year from now.
 
 
SEASONS ACTIVITY STATION
Kacie Shourd
Charles W. Brown Planetarium
Ball State University
518 North Dicks Street
Muncie, Indiana 47303
knshourd@bsu.edu, knshourd@gmail.com
 
Abstract: In order to facilitate and promote the learning of STEM topics in the planetarium, the Charles W. Brown Planetarium at Ball State is currently developing activity carts to educationally engage guests before and after shows. As a planetarium intern, I have taken on the responsibility of developing one of these activity stations to teach guests about the Earth’s changing seasons. One of the most common misconceptions about seasons amongst the general public is that our seasons are a result of the Earth’s distance from the Sun. Through this interactive learning station, guests will become familiar with the idea that seasons are a result of the Earth’s tilt, not the Earth-Sun distance relationship. This will be done through various activities at the station, including solar panel toys and a thermal, color changing surface, to demonstrate the effects of the seasonal variations in the angle of insolation at a given location. This project is funded by the Indiana Space Grant Consortium.
 
 
THE SPACE PLACE REBORN: A UNIVERSITY, THE COMMUNITY, AND A SCHOOL BOARD RESCUE THE BOOKER T. WASHINGTON PLANETARIUM
James R. Webb
Donnie Hale Jr.
Cristian Carrenza
Dept. of Physics
Florida International University
Miami, Florida 33199
webbj@fiu.edu
 
Abstract: The Booker T. Washington (BTW) high school in downtown Miami for many years excited the students and the community with its planetarium, aptly named “The Space Place”. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts in the Miami-Dade school system, the planetarium fell out of use, its old equipment not serviced, and its doors closed for more than 10 years. Florida International University, driven by its previous success in a program entitled “The Education Effect” and fueled by FIU faculty and administration, found a community donor to help start a dual enrollment astronomy class at BTW. These efforts propelled the Miami-Dade School board to fund the reanimation of the Space Place in a big way, with a brand new digital projector and upgrades all around.
 
 
STAGES AND STYLES: HOW PEOPLE LEARN
Karrie Berglund
Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.
817 Pacific Avenue
Bremerton, Washington 98337
karrie@DigitalisEducation.com
 
Susan Reynolds Button
Quarks to Clusters
8793 Horseshoe Lane
Chittenango, New York 13037
sbuttonq2c@gmail.com
 
Abstract: This workshop explored different learning styles (kinesthetic, aural, haptic, etc.) and stages of development, based on Jean Piaget’s research.
 
Editor’s Note: This was a repeat of the workshop the authors presented at the 2013 GLPA conference. See the 2013 Proceedings for a complete text of the workshop.
 
 
Workshops:
 
GLIPSA PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP
Karrie Berglund
Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.
817 Pacific Avenue
Bremerton, Washington 98337
karrie@DigitalisEducation.com
 
Dave Bradstreet
Eastern University/Fowler Planetarium
1300 Eagle Road
Saint Davids, Pennsylvania 19087-3696
dbrastr@eastern.edu
 
Keith Davis
University of Notre Dame DVT
309 Jordan Hall of Science
College of Science
Notre Dame, Indiana 46616
Keith.Davis.DVT@nd.edu
 
Wendy Saver
Ball State University
Dep’t of Theater and Dance
Arts & Communications Bldg, Room AC 306
Muncie, Indiana 47306
wsaver@bsu.edu
 
Kim Small
Sandy Run Middle School Planetarium
520 Twining Road
Dresher, Pennsylvania 19025-1995
ksmall@udsd.org
 
April Whitt
Fernbank Science Center
156 Heaton Park Drive NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30307-1398
april.whitt@fernbank.edu
 
Abstract: This all-day workshop was intended to give GLPA attendees a sense of what happens at the annual Live Interactive Planetarium Symposium (LIPS). LIPS is an annual multi-day gathering that focuses on all facets of live programming: Presentation skills; sample activities; etc. GLIPSA was open to anyone registered to attend GLPA. As with LIPS, ideas and content presented at GLIPSA applied to everyone who does live shows, no matter whether those shows are in a portable dome or fixed, with a digital system or starball.
 
 
IN MEMORY OF ALAN FRIEDMAN
Dayle L. Brown
Pegasus Productions
6109 Tamerlane Drive
South Bend, Indiana 46614
dayledavid@comcast.net
 
Abstract: Alan Friedman, along with Alan Gould and others, was a pioneer for hands-on science in the planetarium. He passed away in May, 2014. Participants in this workshop will receive some of the participatory lessons included in the PASS (Planetarium Activities for Student Success) series. They include “Observing a Variable Star”, by Alan J. Friedman, PASS 2, Activities for the School Planetarium; and “Constellations Tonight,” PASS Volume 5 by Alan Friedman. It is good to know that his work for hands-on science in the planetarium goes on.
 
 
ASTRONOMY EDUCATOR’S MAKE AND TAKE WORKSHOP
David DeRemer
Charles Horwitz Planetarium
School District of Waukesha
S14 W28167 Madison Street
Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188
dderemer@waukesha.k12.wi.us
 
David Hurd
Edinboro University Planetarium
169 Cooper Hall
Edinboro, Pennsylvania 16444
dhurd@edinboro.edu
 
Eugene Zajac
Shaker Heights City School Planetarium
15911 Aldersyde Drive
Shaker Heights, Ohio 44120
starmanpib@gmail.com
 
Abstract: This workshop features the greatest tried-and-true astronomy make-and-take activities that we could find. Activities representing a wide range of grade levels will be presented. Along with getting simple ideas in your hands, we will be emphasizing the use of strategies and techniques that benefit ALL students (Universal Design for Learning). Additional ideas from workshop participants are encouraged and are welcomed.
 
 
SCIENCE STANDARDS: WHERE ARE WE NOW?
Gary Sampson
Gary E. Sampson Planetarium
880 Hi Ridge Avenue
Waukesha, Wisconsin 53186
sampsoga@gmail.com
 
Susan C. Batson
North Hills High School
53 Rochester Road
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15229
batsons.nhsd@gmail.com
 
Abstract: A summary of adoption of science standards by Great Lakes states indicated that only Illinois has adopted the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS); other states are at various stages of adoption. The EQuIP rubric was introduced as a means to analyze how well the new instructional materials integrate with the NGSS. Bybee’s 5Es of Lesson Plan Design and his Preliminary Screening provide a further means to integrate classroom and planetarium activities with the NGSS. Also, the work of Julia Plummer was given as a concrete example of integrating a specific NGSS Performance Expectation with classroom and planetarium activities. Breakout groups at four grade levels developed lesson plans using the NGSS to integrate classroom and planetarium activities for Performance Expectations at their grade level.