GLPA Conference Proceedings: 2016

GLPA Members:  You can download these Proceedings using the following link. Note that you must be logged in to download the PDF file.

2016 Proceedings PDF:
 
2016 Supplemental Materials:
 
Non-members:  You can order a PDF of this Proceeding ($3) or the entire Proceedings CD ($4) through the online store.

 

Here are the titles and abstracts for the Invited Speakers, Contributed Papers, Posters, and Workshops offered during the 2016 GLPA Conference:

 

Invited Speakers:

 

HIGGLEDY-PIGGLEDY IN THE PLANETARIUM

Richard Bellon

History Department

Michigan State University

East Lansing, Michigan 48824

bellonr@msu.edu

 

Abstract: Why did John Herschel react so warily to Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection? I’ve located the answer in Herschel’s deep philosophical commitment to the belief that a calm regularity underlies the natural world. In the eyes of the great astronomer, Darwin’s explanation of species origin relied on a process of “higgledy-piggledy” that could not account for natural order and harmony. In the process of making this argument in planetariums, I have realized that this venue offers a rich opportunity for a different type of historical storytelling, even if my Herschel-Darwin story does not take full advantage of what a planetarium offers.

 

 

ASTRONOMY UPDATE FOR THE PLANETARIAN 2016

Ronald Kaitchuck

The Charles W. Brown Planetarium

Ball State University

Muncie, Indiana 47306

rkaitchu@bsu.edu

 

Abstract: This year brought the first direct detection of gravitational waves. This is one of the most important scientific breakthroughs of our time. It confirms General Relativity Theory and opens a new observational window to the universe. Other discoveries of this past year range from the very small objects to the possible origins of dark matter. Discoveries include a companion asteroid for Earth, the evidence for running water on Mars is evaporating, and Ceres shows evidence of an ancient ocean and a cryovolcano. Juno arrived at Jupiter and gave us the first good views of its poles. Europa shows evidence of water geysers. The Rosetta mission came to an end just as the Philae lander was found. The discoveries about Pluto continued. These include floating ice hills and the possibility of an ocean beneath its crust. There is evidence for the existence of a ninth planet in our solar system. The nearest star to the Sun has 3 Earth-size planets that could be habitable. A strange star was discovered by the Kepler satellite. Astronomers struggle to understand the cause of its light variations. A record-breaking supernova was seen that challenges our understanding its explosive process. Astronomers have seen a massive black hole wandering in intergalactic space. A galaxy was found that is almost entirely made of dark matter. It has been proposed that what we perceive as dark matter is actually primordial black holes from the Big Bang.

 

 

DREAMERS CAN BE DOERS: NO DREAM IS TOO HIGH

2016 Armand Spitz Memorial Lecture

Gary E. Sampson

Gary E. Sampson Planetarium

880 Hi Ridge Avenue

Waukesha, Wisconsin 53186

sampsoga@gmail.com

 

Abstract: A dream can be described as “a strongly desired outcome or purpose.” The origin of GLPA, a high school astronomy course, and entering space—all three of these events were the result of dreams. These three events are evidence that dreamers can be doers, and that no dream is too high.

 

 

 

Contributed Papers:
 

PRESCHOOLERS IN THE PLANETARIUM — NO MORE TEARS

Katy Accetta

Lake Erie Nature & Science Center

28728 Wolf Road

Bay Village, Ohio 44140

katya@lensc.org

 

Abstract: The Lake Erie Nature & Science Center has reconfigured our preschool public planetarium shows. Using new techniques along with old forgotten ones, we have increased attendance, more enthusiasm from the children and no more tears under the dome. I will share our ideas and prove that you, too, can have 0-3 year olds under your dome without a meltdown.

 

 

THE NIGHT SKY NETWORK AS A RESOURCE

Cheri Adams

Boonshoft Museum of Discovery

2600 DeWeese Parkway

Dayton, Ohio 45414

cadams@boonshoftmuseum.org

 

Abstract: The Night Sky Network is a nationwide coalition of amateur astronomy clubs, bringing the science, technology, and inspiration of NASA’s missions to the general public. JPL works in partnership with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in the development of resources that your amateur astronomy club can utilize in a planetarium, an observatory, a classroom, or under the real night sky. Membership is free and allows your club access to all of the Network’s resources. How to apply as well as a few examples of these resources will be demonstrated.

 

 

MY PERSONAL SPACE GUIDE: AN ONLINE CHILDREN’S PLAYGROUND OF SPACE EXPLORATION

Alexa Alpern

Ward Beecher Planetarium

Youngstown State University

One University Plaza

Youngstown, Ohio 44555

ajaanimations@gmail.com

 

Abstract: It is a new world today; technology is on the loose and is found everywhere. So why fight it? Why not join it? “My Personal Space Guide” is to be a new online kid-friendly virtual alien pet community, where children of all ages can come and grow with their new virtual pet educating themselves from the provided games and animations. Scientists can be a part of “My Personal Space Guide,” by providing research or educational information that will be taken and transformed into the fun online modules children from all over will be learning from.

 

 

ENHANCING OUR EXHIBITS

Nick Anderson

Lake Erie Nature & Science Center

28728 Wolf Road

Bay Village, Ohio 44140

nicka@lensc.org

 

Abstract: I will describe new exhibits that the Lake Erie Nature & Science Center plans to incorporate, as well as the funding and partnerships that have facilitated these improvements.

 

 

THE STEMINISTA PROJECT: ENCOURAGING MIDDLE SCHOOL GIRLS TO CONTINUE STUDYING SCIENCE

Paulette Auchtung

Michigan Science Center

5020 John R St

Detroit, Michigan 48202

Paulette.auchtung@mi-sci.org

 

Abstract: Why are there so few women in STEM fields? We have found that girls become disinterested in science around middle school. At the Michigan Science Center we have started The STEMinista Project to keep girls interested in science. Find out how we are trying to achieve this and what you can do to help.

 

 

ADAPTING TO DIFFERENT AGES IN A SUMMER CAMP PLANETARIUM CURRICULUM

Jeanne E. Bishop

Westlake Schools Planetarium

24525 Hilliard Road

Westlake, Ohio 44145

jeanneebishop@wowway.com

 

Abstract: During the last two summers, I have prepared and presented a series of planetarium programs for the Westlake Schools Summer Camp Program. About 200 students attended the planetarium five times each summer. I will discuss the program content, how it was selected, and how I adapted various topics to students in age groups 5–6, 7–8, 9–11, and 12–14.

 

 

VALENTINE SHOWS @ THE PLANETARIUM

Robert Bonadurer

Daniel M. Soref Planetarium

Milwaukee Public Museum

800 West Wells Street

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233

bonadurer@mpm.edu

 

Abstract: Can "Love Stories in the Sky" create some buzz for your planetarium? How would "Romancing the Stars” help your planetarium achieve its mission? This paper will look at results from over 20 planetariums that present Valentine type shows.

 

 

ILLUSTRATING THE OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR THE GEOCENTRIC AND HELIOCENTRIC MODELS VIA FULLDOME VIDEO

Ann E. Bragg

Anderson Hancock Planetarium

Marietta College

215 Fifth Street

Marietta, Ohio 45750

ann.bragg@marietta.edu

 

Abstract: As part of a sabbatical I am taking this fall (2016), I am creating planetarium video segments to illustrate observational evidence supporting both the geocentric and heliocentric models of the Solar System. The transition between these two models is one of the major themes in my introductory astronomy course; I have found getting students to understand and engage with the nature of the observational evidence to be challenging. Evidence to be covered includes the lack of observed stellar parallax by eye, retrograde motion of the planets, the phases of Venus, and the orbits of the moons of Jupiter. This talk will present the current status of this project, and, I hope, lead to conversation about the best ways to accomplish my goals.

 

 

2016 OUTSIDE THE DOME

Chuck Bueter

15893 Ashville Ln.

Granger, Indiana 46530

bueter@nightwise.org

 

Abstract: Astronomy outreach in 2016 launched with two Anniversary Stars—Ruchbah in Cassiopeia as the Centennial Star of the National Park Service, and Scheat in Pegasus as the Indiana Bicentennial Star. In a quest to capture the essence of time, pinhole cameras are also collecting sunlight for Anniversary Solargraphs, imaging the sun's arc between the solstices. Preparations are underway for the 2017 solar eclipse, including a Sun Funnel designed by students that can be made with a 3D printer. My dark sky advocacy is targeting blue-rich LED lights, with public calls for better lighting management, assessments of the night sky at local parks, a Lenten Light Fast, and more. Details are at www.nightwise.org.

 

 

OPEN YOUR DOME TO CLOSED CAPTIONING

Steve Burkland

Adler Planetarium

1300 S. Lake Shore Drive

Chicago, Illinois 60605

sburkland@adlerplanetarium.org

 

Abstract: Captioning will soon be considered a basic accessibility service provided and maintained by venues themselves. How do you transition your dome to accommodate captioning in a cost effective way? Are there low-light options, or are you trading the darkness in your dome for improved accessibility? The Adler Planetarium developed a free, low-light, closed captioning option that utilizes a visitor’s own mobile device. This paper will cover the basic design elements of web-based closed captioning, and some of the challenges encountered during development. Usage data and visitor feedback will be discussed, and you’ll have an opportunity to try out the system on your own device.

 

 

NEW IPS CULTURAL EXCHANGE INITIATIVES — GET INVOLVED

Susan Reynolds Button

Quarks to Clusters

8793 Horseshoe Lane

Chittenango, New York 13037

sbuttonq2c@gmail.com

 

Abstract: The IPS Council is very excited to announce two wonderful new initiatives for members: the first is designed to support professional development and the second to provide materials that can enhance scriptwriting with perspectives from a variety of nations.

 

 

COLLABORATION BETWEEN THEATRE AND PLANETARIUM: A TALE OF SCALE

Jean Creighton

Robin Mello

UW-Milwaukee (UWM) Manfred Olson Planetarium

Physics Department

P. O. Box 413

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201

jcreight@uwm.edu

rmello@uwm.edu

 

Abstract: We think that challenging the boundaries between art and science is a good way to inspire students to learn about the cosmos. We are currently teaching an interdisciplinary undergraduate course called Tale of Scale for the second time. The course culminates in a public performance at the UWM Planetarium where our students use storytelling techniques to show astronomical phenomena and explain the scale of the universe. In this paper we share insights from last years’ pilot and discuss the changes we have made in this, our first full year of implementation. One of the biggest changes we made has been the inclusion of service learning in the UWM Planetarium.

 

 

CHOOSING YOUR OWN PLANETARIUM EXPERIENCE

Derek Demeter

Emil Buehler Planetarium

Seminole State College of Florida

100 Weldon Blvd

Sanford, Florida 32773

demeterd@seminolestate.edu

 

Abstract: For years it has been a challenge for many of us to find strategies for return visits to our planetariums. We here at the Emil Buehler Planetarium have designed a series of live and interactive programs that allow guests to control the direction of the shows by utilizing our new “Planetarium Interactive Response System.” No two shows are alike, thus encouraging guest to come back for more!

 

 

COSMOQUEST AND YOU: FREE FULLDOME MATERIALS FOR PLANETARIUMS

Patrick R. Durrell

Alexa Alpern

Curt Spivey

Annie Wilson

Ward Beecher Planetarium

Youngstown State University

Youngstown, Ohio 44555

 

Pamela L Gay

SIUE

 

Toshi Komatsu

De Anza College

 

Yolanda Marchante

The Lawrence Hall of Science/UC Berkeley

 

Abstract: CosmoQuest (cosmoquest.org) is a virtual research facility where people can not only learn about the Universe, but can also get everybody interested enough in science to take part in astronomical research through a variety of Citizen Science Projects (CSP). An important goal of our project is to make educational fulldome materials freely available to planetariums and Science On a Sphere® (SOS) installations worldwide using NASA images and results from the myriad CSPs that will be carried out over the five-year project. I will describe efforts at YSU’s Ward Beecher Planetarium to develop and produce new fulldome videos and images.

 

 

GLPA, VISION 2020, AND IPS (PART I)

Jon Elvert

IPS Consultant

3526 Bon Sejour Avenue

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70820

jelvert1@gmail.com

 

Karrie Berglund

Digitalis

 

Mark SubbaRao

Adler Planetarium

 

Dan Tell

California Academy of Sciences

 

Abstract: This paper summarizes several recommendations made by IPS’ Vision 2020 Initiative for overhauling and expanding membership benefits, including restructuring membership/benefit categories, adopting a mission statement, and a redesign of its web site. GLPA members will have an opportunity to help approve these recommendations this fall.

 

 

GLPA, VISION 2020, AND IPS (PART II)

Jon Elvert

IPS Consultant

3526 Bon Sejour Avenue

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70820

jelvert1@gmail.com

 

Karrie Berglund

Digitalis

 

Mark SubbaRao

Adler Planetarium

 

Dan Tell

California Academy of Sciences

 

Abstract: The primary goals of Vision 2020 are to create strategies for membership growth and sustainability. This paper proposes three of the six V2020 goals that emphasize professional development support for planetarians (including affiliates), collaboration efforts with global astronomy education/research partners, and preparing for the next generation of planetarium design and technologies.

 

 

ACCESSIBLE SPACE SCIENCE: EXCEPTIONALITIES, COMPLIANCE AND UNIVERSAL DESIGN IN PLANETARIA

Anna Rebecca Green

Planetarium Manager

James S. McDonnell Planetarium at the Saint Louis Science Center

5050 Oakland Avenue

Saint Louis, Missouri 63139

Anna.Green@slsc.org

 

Abstract: Planetaria serve a variety of people with varying abilities every day. Not all visitors have the same abilities as others, and exceptionalities that prevent them from fully enjoying being in the dome make a visit to the planetarium perhaps not the most positive of experiences. Through Universal Design and best practices, a planetarium can engage all visitors while complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act, 504 and other international laws that require equal access for all. This paper discusses how planetarium staff can most effectively work with visitors with exceptionalities, especially visitors who are visually impaired, have auditory impairments, or an autism spectrum disorder. The primary case study is the Feeling the Stars program, successfully implemented in the McDonnell Planetarium at the Saint Louis Science Center for visitors who are blind or have low vision; however, other American and international planetaria museums and organizations (focusing on visitors with autism spectrum disorder, visitors who are deaf or hard of hearing, and visitors who may need extra physical support) are examined as well.

 

 

RHODE ISLAND DOES IT AGAIN

Francine Jackson

URI Planetarium

P. O. Box 353

University of Rhode Island

Providence, Rhode Island 02901

francine_jackson@brown.edu

 

Abstract: Recently it was found that a train wreck in Rhode Island contributed to time zones. Now, another incident had the state in the news, both internationally and historically, as a local organization has found the remains of a very famous ship.

 

 

BUILDING THE WORLD’S HIGHEST RESOLUTION MIRRORDOME PLANETARIUM

Chris Janssen

Planetarium of the Wausau School District

Wausau West High School

1200 West Wausau Avenue

Wausau, Wisconsin54401

cjanssen@wausauschools.org

 

Abstract: In the beginning mirror dome projection was more of a novelty, a "special effects" projector only. With the explosion of much better technology, achieving very good results is now a reality. This method actually optimizes the use of commodity video chips. Learn the pros and cons as well as the component pieces I used to completely renovate our theater around this burgeoning and quality technology.

 

 

CAREERS IN SPACE EXPLORATION PROJECT: FREE CONTENT

Renae S. Kerrigan

Peoria Riverfront Museum Dome Planetarium

222 SW Washington St.

Peoria, Illinois 61603

rkerrigan@peoriariverfrontmuseum.org

 

Abstract: The Peoria Riverfront Museum extended our traveling exhibition “Be the Astronaut” with a kiosk exploring non-astronaut jobs that contribute to space exploration. Science writer Emily Lakdawalla, planetary scientist Sarah Horst, and JPL media producer Stephen Epstein recorded short videos describing their jobs and why they think space exploration is important. We are offering our videos to the community for free, so anyone can make their own kiosk, and inviting others to contribute.

 

 

PLANETARIUM VISITOR IMPRESSIONS: GETTING TO KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE — A DISCUSSION BASED ON TRIPADVISOR REVIEWS

Greg Mancari

SCISS

18061 E Lehigh Place

Aurora, Colorado 80013

greg.mancari@sciss.se

 

Abstract: Analysis based on 700 reviews made over the last three years from planetarium visits around the globe on the world’s largest travel site, TripAdvisor.com. The paper seeks to provide a greater understanding of visitor impressions following a planetarium visit, show how this insight can lead to stronger target marketing strategies and to encourage the use of creative and inexpensive market research methods.

 

 

FROM DOMECASTING TO VR CASTING

Patrick McPike

Mark SubbaRao

Adler Planetarium

1300 South Lake Shore Drive

Chicago, Illinois 60605

pmcpike@adlerplanetarium.org

 

Abstract: Domecasting and VR casting is expanding the reach of the planetarium. With this new technology the potential to reach new audiences is expanding at a rapid pace. The positive payoff associated with creating a planetarium experience in domecast and VR-cast such as the Adler’s Kavli lecture series makes it worth facing any challenges that may lie ahead.

 

 

CONVERSION OF GLPA'S STARGAZER SHOW TO FULLDOME USING COLLEGE STUDENT ANIMATORS

Ken Murphy

Southwest Minnesota State University Planetarium

1501 State St.

Marshall, Minnesota 56258

ken.murphy@smsu.edu

 

Abstract: GLPA's The Stargazer show is now complete as a fulldome show and is available to GLPA members. This paper will discuss how the conversion process was done through the creation of a 1-credit Blender animation college course designed to recruit student animators. Also to be discussed is how to obtain the show, formatting options, resources that accompany the show, and pricing.

 

 

FULLDOME PRODUCTION ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET

AmyJo Proctor

Physics Foundry

2522 W 2725 N

Farr West, Utah 84404

amyjo@physicsfoundry.com

 

Abstract: Eclipses and Phases of the Moon was produced for an experimental low-cost pricing model, targeting small and portable planetariums. As such, the show itself needed to be made as inexpensively as possible. Free software and several free and low-cost internet-based resources were leveraged for the production and distribution of the show, including Blender, render.st, fiverr.com, incompetech.com, jewelbeat.com, freesound.org, prosoundeffects.com, and vimeo.com. An overview of these resources will be presented.

 

 

GETTING A FEEL FOR ECLIPSES

Kenneth P. Quinn

Tactile Graphics Evaluator

Haptically Speaking

234 East 29th Street

Erie, Pennsylvania 16504

cj3639@gmail.com

 

David W. Hurd

Haptically Speaking

Edinboro, Pennsylvania 16412

 

Abstract: Edinboro University of Pennsylvania Planetarium, in conjunction with NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute and the College of Charleston, has created a unique resource for learning details about the 2017 eclipse and eclipses in general. This tactile book includes tactiles for the blind and visually impaired, but also is useful for sighted learners. This paper will highlight this resource and some of the activity sets that accompany the book. Those who attend this paper will each receive a copy of “Getting a Feel for Eclipses.”

 

 

SPHERICAL VIDEO: YOU HAVE [EVEN MORE] POWER!

David Rabkin

Director, Charles Hayden Planetarium

Museum of Science

1 Science Park

Boston, Massachusetts 02114-1099

drabkin@mos.org

 

Abstract: At the 2014 GLPA conference, I reported on work by the Museum of Science, Boston's Charles Hayden Planetarium to create low-cost, remarkably high-quality spherical video for use in the dome. The paper offered advice on how to get started, and encouraged others to take advantage of this useful emerging technology. This paper is an update, two years later, and shares some of our successes and lessons using spherical video in the production of the fulldome show From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA. Also, it reports on several of our experiments, outlines recent developments in the field, and poses questions about how 360 video can best be used. This field is continues to develop at a rapid pace, and now is a great time for planetariums to experiment with 360 video to support their live presentations and fulldome production.

 

 

THE 2016 SOLAR ECLIPSE IN INDONESIA AND 7 OTHERS

Sheldon Schafer

Planetarium Director Emeritus,

Peoria Riverfront Museum

222 SW Washington

Peoria, Illinois 61602

Adjunct Faculty

Bradley University

Peoria, Illinois 61625

sls@fsmail.bradley.edu

 

Abstract: Eclipse chasing is a pursuit that takes one to the far corners of the Earth, and once chasing an eclipse even saved my life. This paper will review a journey to Indonesia to observe a total eclipse of the Sun this past March, and five other past total eclipse expeditions. The summary will suggest a framing for the 2017 Great American Eclipse, that the 7th natural wonder of the world is a total solar eclipse.

 

 

USING WORLDWIDE TELESCOPE TO BUILD INTERACTIVE KIOSKS IN DIFFERENT CONTENT AREAS

Shannon Schmoll

Abrams Planetarium

755 Science Rd

East Lansing, Michigan 48824

schmoll@pa.msu.edu

 

Abstract: Worldwide Telescope is a free software from Microsoft Research that has several capabilities for use in a planetarium. One such capability is creating interactive kiosks for visitors. The Abrams Planetarium recently received a grant to purchase 3 all-in-one touchscreen computers in order to build these kiosks. This paper will outline processes in building the content for these touchscreens as well as how to get the content from us if you would like to display it in your planetarium. Each touchscreen has a unique content theme including Astronomy in Chile, the Multiwavelength Universe, and the Apollo Missions. The Multiwavelength Universe flies people to various objects in the sky and crossfades stacked multiwavelength images to show what we learn with different types of light. Astronomy in Chile explores some of the work done with telescopes in Chile and why the country is well-suited for astronomy. It uses the built in astronomical images found in WWT, imported other images with AVM data, and used the Sphere Toaster software within the WWT suite to process and display photospheres from Chile. Finally, the Apollo Missions explores various aspects of the Apollo program from why it was named Apollo, to the media inspired by the Moon. It incorporates images, recordings of the astronauts, and built-in WWT panorama images of the landing sites visitors can explore.

 

 

LET’S PLAY: INTERACTIVE GAMING IN THE PLANETARIUM

Talia Sepersky

Charles Hayden Planetarium

Museum of Science

1 Science Park

Boston, Massachusetts 02114-1099

tsepersky@mos.org

 

Abstract: In April 2016 the staff of the Charles Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Science, Boston, attempted a new form of public event based around text-based adventure games. Using the game “Space Station” as our source material, we turned what is traditionally an entirely non-visual game into a unique immersive experience by creating fulldome visuals to match the game settings. This paper will describe what we did to create the visuals and how we used them on the dome. It will also describe the actual event in which we ran the game with the participation of a full planetarium audience and what we learned from this innovative evening in our dome.

 

 

PUTTING THE “E” BACK IN “STEM”: FREE ENGINEERING MATERIALS FOR THE PLANETARIUM

Talia Sepersky

Charles Hayden Planetarium

Museum of Science

1 Science Park

Boston, Massachusetts 02114-1099

tsepersky@mos.org

 

Abstract: In 2015, the staff of the Charles Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Science, Boston, as part of a partnership with NASA, created and released three education modules focusing on spacecraft engineering. Offered free of charge to all interested planetariums and classrooms, these modules take small aspects of spacecraft engineering mentioned in the planetarium show “From Dream to Discovery: Inside NASA” and present them in much greater detail. This paper will describe the modules’ content and the unique narrative framework employed for each, as well as how to obtain them.

 

 

HOW DO I REACH THESE KIDS?: POKÉMON IN THE PLANETARIUM

Mike Smail

Adler Planetarium

1300 S Lake Shore Dr.

Chicago, Illinois 60605

msmail@adlerplanetarium.org

 

Abstract: Pokémon GO roared to life this summer giving kids of all ages new incentive to visit museums, planetaria, and other cultural institutions in their community. We’ll take a look at some proven ways that museums and planetaria have used this mobile game to drive people through their doors, and how you can do the same.

 

 

INTERNATIONAL PLANETARIUM SOCIETY UPDATE

Mike Smail

Adler Planetarium

1300 S Lake Shore Dr.

Chicago, Illinois 60605

msmail@adlerplanetarium.org

 

Abstract: Much like GLPA, the International Planetarium Society (IPS) is undergoing dynamic change in its methods and membership. In this session, we'll discuss new cultural and educational initiatives being undertaken, summarize the IPS2016 conference in Warsaw, Poland, and look ahead to IPS2018 in Toulouse, France.

 

 

MAPPING YOUR VILLAGE — OR UNIVERSE — ON A POSTER

Dale W. Smith

BGSU Planetarium

Dept. of Physics & Astronomy

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green, Ohio 43403

dwsmith@bgsu.edu

 

Abstract: I have recently mapped my boyhood village on posters with a photograph of each house in its proper place on a Google Earth background. These posters provide a visual map of the village for two epochs, the 1960s and the 1990s, and will be placed in the village museum. A similar effort could create astronomical posters, for example with photos of selected planetariums or observatories on a world map or images of nebulae, galaxies, or other astronomical objects on a sky map.

 

THE MAKING OF PLANET NINE

Mark SubbaRao

Patrick McPike

Adler Planetarium

1300 South Lake Shore Drive

Chicago, Illinois 60091

msubbarao@adlerplanetarium.org

 

Abstract: The Adler Planetarium’s 2016 feature show Planet Nine chronicles astronomer Michael Brown’s search for a new ninth planet in the solar system. The show opened to critical acclaim and has been very well received by the public. This paper will focus on the aspects of the production that make this show unique: the decision to focus the show around a discovery that has yet to be made, the combination of live-presenter and recorded scientist narration, data visualization driven storytelling, and the extensive use of a real-time planetarium engine (Uniview) in the creation of show visuals.

 

 

SPREADING THE GOSPEL OF ASTRONOMY ACROSS AFRICA

Dave Weinrich

Minnesota State University Moorhead, Retired

S250 State Rd 35 S

Nelson, Wisconsin 54756

Weinrich@mnstate.edu

 

Abstract: While many of the countries in Sub-Saharan Africa have some of the darkest skies in the world, this large area also has the distinction of having the fewest planetariums. Most of the countries in the region do not even have one planetarium. This paper will update some recent developments in Ghana and Kenya to bring more astronomical facilities to Africa, including a new initiative by the International Planetarium Society.

 

 

STUDENT BUILT LED LIGHTING SYSTEM FOR PLANETARIUMS

Anthony Woltman

Dana Koczur

Sara Schultz

Minnesota State University Moorhead

1104 7th Ave S

Moorhead, Minnesota 56563

woltmanan@mnstate.edu

koczurda@mnstate.edu

schultz@mnstate.edu

 

Abstract: This project involved students researching, testing, and programming an LED light system for the MSUM Planetarium. They were able to control 90 feet or 1700 LEDs around the circumference of the planetarium dome. The project demands an understanding of electricity, digital and analog electronics, and programming. The goal was to create an easy and cost-effective LED lighting system to use for several different events. The system allows for a multimedia functionality for planetarium shows, group gaming and team building using Artemis Spaceship Simulator, and possible outside interests to utilize the new electronics.

 
 
 
Posters:
 

MORE THAN PRETTY PICTURES

Jackie Baughman

Former Edwin Clark Schouweiler Memorial Planetarium

2020 Woodhaven Dr. Apt 6

Fort Wayne, Indiana 46819

qnbaughman@gmail.com

 

Abstract: Along the inside perimeter of the Edwin Clark Schouweiler Memorial Planetarium, there was a mural of the constellations of the zodiac. This mural was an iconic part of the planetarium and was something that stuck with visitors long after they visited. During my time at the planetarium, I redesigned and repainted this mural. In the process of doing this, I was able to make it more astronomically accurate. Since I used black-light paint, we were able to illuminate the mural while the lights in the planetarium were low. By doing this, we were able to use it as a teaching aid, to help reinforce concepts related to the ecliptic, the constellations of the zodiac, and how the planets moved through these constellations.

 

 

AN URBAN PLANISPHERE

Joe Childers

Boonshoft Museum of Discovery

2600 DeWeese Pkwy

Dayton Ohio 45414

jchilders@boonshoftmuseum.org

 

Abstract: Planispheres are a common learning tool for budding stargazers, but the typical one is not very useful under urban skies. Faint stars that cannot be seen, and worse, constellation figures connecting these invisible stars, are frustrating instead of helpful. This planisphere has stars to only magnitude 3.5, and replaces most stick figures with star names instead, down to magnitude 3.0. Each star’s symbol is scaled in size to its brightness, and horizon masks are included for 40 and 45 degrees north latitudes.

 

 

MISSION: MARS: APPLICATION OF THE NASA CP4SMP(VC+) AWARD AT THE SAINT LOUIS SCIENCE CENTER

Anna Green

Eric Gustafson

William Kelly

Alison Kristoff

Jordan Mogerman

Saint Louis Science Center

5050 Oakland Avenue

Saint Louis, Missouri 63110

Anna.Green@slsc.org

 

Abstract: In 2013 the Saint Louis Science Center (SLSC) applied for, and received, a CP4SMP(VC+) grant from NASA. The grant awarded the SLSC $814,613 over three years beginning in 2014. This grant has been used to improve both the planetarium and a large gallery in the Science Center’s main building to enhance the visitor experience while teaching visitors important science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) content focused on Mars exploration. This paper will focus on the process the SLSC followed to apply for, receive and carryout the grant, as well as the benefits and suggestions for others who may wish to apply for the award in the future.

 

 

DESIGNING A MULTISENSORY, EXHIBIT-RELATED PLANETARIUM SHOW ON A BUDGET

Emily Hromi

Interim Planetarium Manager

Roger B. Chaffee Planetarium

Grand Rapids Public Museum

272 Pearl Street NW

Grand Rapids, Michigan 49504

ehromi@grpm.org

 

Abstract: Planetaria within museums often draw crowds when offering a show that is relevant to a traveling exhibit. On a limited budget that does not necessarily allow for the lease of an existing fulldome show, it is still possible to design and execute a live show that combines various forms of multimedia, is educational and engaging, and is relevant to a traveling exhibit (or two!), and attracts the same intended audience. In Spring 2016, the Grand Rapids Public Museum’s Roger B. Chaffee Planetarium designed a live show called Starlight Safari to accompany two traveling exhibits, The Robot Zoo and Earth Explorers. In this show, visitors interacted with the presenter as they traveled to five different biomes and learned about the animals that live there as well as the animals that “live” in the sky in that part of the world. This poster will highlight the various types of media and methods utilized, programs used during development, the benefits of an exhibit-related show, and more.

 

 

IPS OFFICER ELECTIONS

Mike Smail

Adler Planetarium

1300 S Lake Shore Dr.

Chicago, Illinois 60605

msmail@adlerplanetarium.org

 

Abstract: This fall, International Planetarium Society (IPS) members will vote on a full slate of organization officers: President-Elect, Secretary, and Treasurer/Membership Chair. Read position statements from prospective candidates, and maybe even talk to some of them first-hand at this poster session.

 

 

IPS 2020 BID LOCATIONS

Mike Smail

Adler Planetarium

1300 S Lake Shore Dr.

Chicago, Illinois 60605

msmail@adlerplanetarium.org

 

Abstract: Three global cities have submitted bids to host the 2020 International Planetarium Society (IPS) conference: Bogota, Columbia; Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; and Houston, USA. GLPA's IPS Representative, Mike Smail, will cast a single vote for one of these locations on behalf of GLPA at the IPS Council meeting in Fall, 2017. Learn more about content, costs, and planned activities for each conference, and submit your vote for which location you would most like to attend.

 

 

ENCODING SLIDE-RICH CLASSIC SHOWS INTO SPITZ SCIDOME

Dale W. Smith

BGSU Planetarium

Dept. of Physics & Astronomy

Bowling Green State University

Bowling Green, Ohio 43403

dwsmith@bgsu.edu

 

Abstract: This poster illustrates and updates my earlier oral paper on encoding classic slide shows into SciDome. The updated user's guide will appear in the Proceedings and will cover slide scanning, image preparation, and encoding, so may be helpful to users of any full-dome system who want to import classic shows.

 

 

GIS DATA TO PLANETARIUM DOME

Dayna Thompson

Charles W. Brown Planetarium

 

Kevin Turcotte

Department of Geography

 

Ball State University

2000 W Riverside Ave
Muncie, Indiana 47306

dlthompson3@bsu.edu

turk@bsu.edu

 

Abstract: Through funding from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium (INSGC), colleagues from the Department of Geography and the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Ball State collaborated to determine the capabilities of moving spatial datasets from the Geographic Information Science (GIScience) lab to the Brown Planetarium. Working with RSA Cosmos, we were able to successfully transform spatial data (that were generated using GIS mapping software) to the dome. This poster will outline how we plan expand on this and test the transformation of GIS data to the dome at a range of scales, from global to local. We plan on determining explicit requirements for producing GIS output suitable for transformation to the dome, as well as developing tools that streamline the GIS and digital dome processes involved.

 

 

A NEW WAY FOR CHAOS

Arylyn Trout

Emily Porter

Jacob Salis

Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

169 Cooper Hall

Edinboro, Pennsylvania 16444

ep133505@scots.edinboro.edu

 

Abstract: At Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, our planetarium is located in Cooper Hall. CHAOS (Cooper Hall Ambassadors of Science) is a student-led organization that focuses on engaging college students of all majors and backgrounds in presenting science to school groups visiting the natural history museum and planetarium. This poster will highlight some of the unique aspects of CHAOS and offers suggestions for implementing similar opportunities at your venue.

 
 
 
Workshops:
 

GLIPSA 2016

Karrie Berglund

Digitalis Education Solutions

817 Pacific Avenue

Bremerton, Washington 98337

karrie@DigitalisEducation.com

 

Abstract: This all day workshop was intended to give GLPA attendees a sense of what happens at the annual Live Interactive Planetarium Symposium (LIPS). LIPS is a multi-day gathering that focuses on all facets of live programming: presentation skills; sample activities; etc. GLIPSA was open to anyone registered to attend GLPA. As with LIPS, ideas and content presented at GLIPSA are intended to apply to everyone who does live shows, no matter whether those shows are in a portable dome or fixed, with a digital system or starball. 2016 was the fourth GLIPSA, and there were 30 attendees.

 

 

NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS (NGSS) IN THE DOME

Karrie Berglund

Digitalis Education Solutions

817 Pacific Avenue

Bremerton, Washington 98337

karrie@DigitalisEducation.com

 

Abstract: This 45-minute workshop is designed to provide a short overview of the Next Generation Science Standards, including the history, adoption by various states, and design rationale. The various components of the NGSS will be identified and explained (Performance Expectations, Disciplinary Core Ideas, etc.). After the introduction and overview, participants work in small groups to design a planetarium activity targeting one or more NGSS. The activities will be shared with the larger group orally during the session and afterward via email. The goal is for each participant to leave with at least one idea for an activity to do in the planetarium that targets one or more NGSS.

 

 

FLIP YOUR DOME!

Susan Reynolds Button

Quarks to Clusters

8793 Horseshoe Lane

Chittenango, New York 13037

sbuttonq2c@gmail.com

 

Abstract: I know what you are thinking, I represent portable domes and this is a term we frequently use, especially if a fire marshal asks us to demonstrate a second method of egress! Well that is not what this workshop was all about. We explored a way to turn things upside down, to refresh lessons for you and your students. You can set up unique scenarios that challenge students to be more observant solve problems and demonstrate that they have a real working knowledge of the topic you are teaching.

 

 

CURRENT ISSUES IN THE HISTORY OF ASTRONOMY (short course)

Stephen Case

Strickler Planetarium

Olivet Nazarene University

One University Avenue

Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914

scase@olivet.edu

 

Abstract: Similar to the annual “Astronomy Update” approach, this short course will give an introduction and overview to some of the current issues and topics in the field of the history of astronomy, including recent work on the history of the intelligent life debate, the Copernican Revolution, and the development of stellar astronomy. In particular, this course will provide resources for astronomy educators interested in learning more about the history of astronomy in order to contextualize and nuance common perceptions regarding the historical interactions of science and religion and the narrative of the Copernican Revolution.

 

 

NGSS ALIGNED LESSONS IN THE PLANETARIUM (panel discussion)

Peggy Hernandez

Elgin SD U-46 Planetarium/ENWC Observatory

355 E. Chicago St.-Science Office

Elgin, Illinois 60120

peggyhernandez@u-46.org

 

Jean Creighton

Univ. Wisconsin-Milwaukee-Manfred Olson Planetarium

PO Box 413

Physics Dept.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201

jcreight@uwm.edu

 

Geoff Holt

Madison Metropolitan School District Planetarium

201 South Gammon Rd

Madison, Wisconsin 53717

gholt@madison.k12.wi.us

 

Abstract: Has your state adopted (or is considering adopting) the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)? Participants will hear from planetarians on the panel who have been involved since the frameworks were released. The panelists will share experiences aligning specific grade level planetarium lessons to the NGSS and working with teachers to keep the planetarium experience valuable and powerful for school groups. Be prepared to share and ask questions.

 

 

TEN MONTHS AND COUNTING! ECLIPSE WORKSHOP

Ken Miller

GOTO, Inc.

8060 Clearwater Drive

Indianapolis, Indiana 46256

gotousa@earthlink.net

 

Abstract: Ken Miller, “Host of the 1991 eclipse in Hawaii, will relate what worked well in the months and days leading up to the eclipse. Learn what you can do regarding eye safety, Moon education, and “making hay while the Sun don’t shine” or marketing your planetarium as an essential community resource. And make a few bucks for your institution along the way. • The text below is a summary of the points many of which also appeared in my article in the September 2016 edition of the IPS Planetarian journal. (If you aren’t an IPS member, JOIN!) The points are the same, and I hope they will be useful.

 

 

DIGGING FOR DARK MATTER

Evan Shockley

Nora Wengerski

Mark SubbaRao

Luca Grandi

Randy Landsberg

Ashlea Monti

University of Chicago/KICP

933 E. 56th St.

Chicago, Illinois 60637

eshockley@uchicago.edu

randy@oddjob.uchicago.edu

 

Abstract: The vast majority of our universe is not ordinary matter. The atoms and molecules that we love and are familiar with only account for about 5% of the cosmos. This workshop will delve into details of how experimentalists are trying to directly detect dark matter, the invisible and elusive stuff that is five times as abundant as ordinary matter. Together, we will discuss and explore what we know about this mysterious substance: How do we know it exists? Why haven’t we “seen” it yet? And how you can engage your audiences in this exploration of the “dark side” of the cosmos? Finally, a substantial part of the workshop will be a break-out session to sketch out dark matter ideas for your home institution and to receive feedback from experts who are conducting research, and incorporating dark matter into the planetarium and high school curriculum.

 

 

ASTRONOMY IN THE STRATOSPHERE

April S. Whitt

Fernbank Science Center

156 Heaton Park Drive NE

Atlanta, Georgia 30307

april.whitt@fernbank.edu

 

Abstract: NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) allows teachers to fly with observers, studying IR sources. This workshop takes an overview of the flights, shares materials that teachers have developed, and provides participants with resources for teaching in the classroom or planetarium.