Pleiades Conference Proceedings: 2017

GLPA Members and Pleiades Conference Delegates:  You can download the 2017 Pleiades Conference Proceedings using the following link.
 
2017 Proceedings PDF:
 
 
Here are the titles and abstracts for the Invited Speakers, Contributed Papers, Posters, and Workshops offered during the 2017 Pleiades National Conference:

 

Invited Papers:
 
 
FINDING YOUR FIRST LOVE
2017 Noble/Spitz/Keynote Lecture
 
David W. Hurd
Planetarium Director/Professor
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
169 Cooper Hall
Edinboro, Pennsylvania 16444
dhurd@edinboro.edu
 
Abstract: Challenges, distractions, and even the mundane can sap the vitality of any planetarian. This talk challenges us all to find that “first love” and keep the “main thing” the main thing. Through sharing personal and sometimes embarrassing experiences, Hurd will challenge you to get back on track.
 
 
ASTRONOMY UPDATE FOR THE PLANETARIAN 2017
 
Ronald Kaitchuck
The Charles W Brown Planetarium
Ball State University
2000 W Riverside Ave
Muncie, Indiana 47306
rkaitchu@bsu.edu
 
Abstract: The pace of scientific discoveries has not slowed. So there was great selectivity involved in the choice of topics for this report. This year the Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter to begin its mission while the Cassini probe ended its 13 years of exploration of Saturn. Technology has advanced to the point where the first images of the surface of the star Antares have been made. A star in a distant galaxy has disappeared and is possibly the first time we have seen a star collapse to make a black hole. There is a prediction of a coming merger of two stars in a binary system. Tabby’s star continues to puzzle astronomers but it now seems likely that clouds of dust are involved in the star’s episodes of dimming. Objects called fast radio bursters may be produced by a new type of astronomical object that now appears to be related to young stars. Exoplanet discoveries have continued at a fast rate. An exoplanet as dark as asphalt and another with the density of Styrofoam have been found. The star Tau Ceti has 4 earth-size planets and the star Trappist-1 has 7 more. The existence of ultra diffuse galaxies continues to puzzle astronomers. The radio galaxy Cygnus A has a second supermassive black hole that only recently appeared in images of the galaxy. Astronomer Vera Rubin passed away this year. She taught us about the existence of dark matter. Curiously this year brought evidence that dark matter had different effects on galaxies in the early universe. Some of the most exciting discoveries came from gravitational wave astronomy. The third and fourth gravitational wave detections were from merging black holes. These detections show the existence of a new class of black holes in the range of 25-50 solar masses that our current theories can’t explain.
 
 
GOING TO PLUTO FOR THE FIRST TIME: WHAT WE SAW AND HOW WE SAW IT
 
Paul M. Schenk
Lunar and Planetary Institute
3600 Bay Area Blvd
Houston, Texas 77058
schenk@lpi.usra.edu
 
Abstract: The New Horizons encounter with the Pluto system in July 2015 produced the first high-resolution global maps of this system and specifically Pluto and its large moon Charon. These are the most distant major objects mapped and the first within the Kuiper Belt zone of trans-Neptunian objects. Global maps of morphology, color and topography have been produced with resolutions ranging from ~35 km down to as low as 70 m. These products will be available on the PDS system this autumn and can be used for a variety of applications, including visualization in simulated 3D. They also reveal a body that is remarkable in its Earth-like geologic variety, with eroded mountain ranges 3 to 5 kilometers high, glacially carved valleys and an enormous ice sheet produced by frozen nitrogen and methane. The similarity is a result of the substitution of other ice phases in place of silicates and water ice that give us our dynamic surface on Earth. Charon, similar in size to the icy moons of Saturn and Uranus, is the second-most rugged of the group, with canyons and depressions several kilometers deep, the deepest being 14 km. A large resurfaced plain has an undulating surface and appears to be several kilometers deep as well.
 
 
Contributed Papers:
 
 
A FEW NEW SPACE SONGS
 
Jon Underwood Bell
Hallstrom Planetarium
Indian River State College
3209 Virginia Avenue
Fort Pierce, Florida 34981
jbell@irsc.edu
 
Abstract: Songs are an effective, powerful tool for teaching facts and concepts in most any field of knowledge. As a college instructor, I have come up with some handy mnemonic songs for remembering the spectral classes of stars, or the names and accomplishments of famous astronomers. As a planetarium director, I use songs that are geared for all ages and levels of understanding, such as “There are Plenty of Stars in the Sky,” or “Ode to Planet #9.” Recently I have been branching out into other sciences, with “Mycologenia Dreaming,” “Fungi Isn’t Fun,” “DNA,” “Jocelyn Found a Radio Star, “ and “The Entymologist’s Farewell.”
 
 
SCALE MODEL OF EARTH, MOON, AND SUN
 
Jeanne E. Bishop
Westlake Schools Planetarium
24525 Hilliard Road
Westlake, Ohio 44145
jeanneebishop@wowway.com
 
Abstract: For the August 21, 2017 Great American Eclipse, I wanted to convey the correct scale of diameters of Earth, Moon, and Sun, as well as the distances between them. It always is difficult to convey correct diameters and distances simultaneously. In this paper I will demonstrate the scale and materials I used as well as present some analogies to show relative diameters and distances of space bodies.
 
 
RESPECTING THE ASTROLOGER
 
Robert Bonadurer
Daniel M Soref Planetarium
Milwaukee Public Museum
800 West Wells Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233
bonadurer@mpm.edu
 
Abstract: I am not an astrologer. Repeat, I am not an astrologer. But your planetarium visitor might be. How do handle such a visitor? This paper will explore planetarium opportunities for delving into the power of the zodiac. It will take a fresh look at astrology long ago and its current status today.
 
 
LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE FLOOD
 
Ken Brandt
Robeson Planetarium
201 E Livermore Drive
Pembroke, North Carolina 28372
Ken.starsabove@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Hurricane Matthew reduced much of Lumberton, North Carolina to a hip-deep, or worse, wading pool. This included the Robeson Planetarium and Science Center, which was inundated by 3-4 feet of floodwaters. What have we done, and what are we preparing to do? Come hear about lessons learned, and what you might do to make your institution more disaster-resistant.
 
 
INTERACTIVE PLANETARIA: A CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS
 
Ken Brandt
Robeson Planetarium
201 E Livermore Drive
Pembroke, North Carolina 28372
Ken.starsabove@gmail.com
 
Sara Schultz
Minnesota State University
Moorhead Planetarium
1104 7th Ave S
Moorhead, Minnesota 56563
schultz@mnstate.edu
 
Keith Turner
Carmel Clay Schools Planetarium
Carmel Clay Schools
Noblesville, Indiana 46032
planetarium1972@gmail.com
 
Timothy Slater
University of Wyoming
Laramie, Wyoming 82071
timslaterwyo@gmail.com
 
Abstract: As part of a large footprint research study, a team loosely based at the University of Wyoming is building the infrastructure needed to gather data about nature of interactive planetarium lectures. The specific definition of “interactivity” is still under refinement, and participants at previous conferences are helping to define the notion. The researchers are actively seeking volunteers to provide audio (or video) recordings of live planetarium lectures in order to build a database for systematic study.
 
 
ADLERCAPS: A FREE AND OPEN-SOURCE CAPTIONING SOLUTION
 
Steve Burkland
Adler Planetarium
1300 S Lake Shore Dr
Chicago, Illinois 60605
sburkland@adlerplanetarium org
 
Abstract: Every guest deserves the opportunity to experience your sky shows. But, providing closed captioning shouldn’t require specialized equipment; in fact, it shouldn’t cost anything at all! Learn how to implement this free and exible, web-based solution in your dome or theater.
 
 
SCIENCE VISUALIZATION ON THE DOME
 
Tony Butterfield
Houston Museum of Natural Science
5555 Hermann Park Drive
Houston, Texas 77030
tonyb@hmns.org
 
Abstract: From craters to crinoids, visualization of various collectable artifacts from the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Realistic graphics that use photogrammetry can be used in a planetarium to really help visualize educational topics.
 
 
3D PRINTING IN THE CLASSROOM: WHERE TO GET STARTED
 
Jack Daleske
Peoria Riverfront Museum
222 SW Washington St
Peoria, Illinois 61602
jdaleske@peoriariverfrontmuseum.org
 
Abstract: How can you use 3D printers as a teaching tool? This presentation will be an introduction on how to teach 3D design for K-12 and how to tie it into planetarium content. Emphasis will be on getting started, common pitfalls, and setting expectations for students and parents.
 
 
ANIMATION IN MUSEUMS
 
Aimé DeLattre
Peoria Riverfront Museum Intern
200-248 SW Washington St
Peoria, Illinois 61602
adelattre@mail.bradley.edu
 
Abstract: As an animation intern at the Riverfront museum, I worked with the Planetarium curator to develop a promotional/educational video for the total eclipse this past August. My paper will highlight the steps necessary to educate audiences through animation and how animators can be valuable as interns or faculty to a museum.
 
 
CHOOSING YOUR OWN PLANETARIUM EXPERIENCE
 
Derek Demeter
Emil Buehler Planetarium
Seminole State College of Florida
100 Weldon Blvd
Sanford, Florida 32773
demeterd@seminolestate.edu
 
Abstract: For years it has been a challenge for many of us to find strategies for return visits to our planetariums. We here at the Emil Buehler Planetarium have designed a series of live and interactive programs that allow guests to control the direction of the shows by utilizing our new “Planetarium Interactive Response System.” No two shows are alike thus encouraging guest to come back for more!
 
 
SOLAR ECLIPSE AT TELLUS SCIENCE MUSEUM
 
David Dundee
Tellus Science Museum
100 Tellus Drive
Cartersville, Georgia 30120
davidd@Tellusmuseum.org
 
Abstract: This paper will detail the partnership between Tellus Science Museum and the local ABC TV affiliate for the great eclipse of 2017. Tellus signed an exclusive contract with WSB-TV (local ABC affiliate) to be the exclusive supplier of information and images for the Solar Eclipse. The museum site was in the partial eclipse zone. But Astronomer David Dundee and Chief WSB Meteorologist Glenn Burns traveled to coastal South Carolina to broadcast back images of the eclipse to the museum and the TV viewing audience. Tellus had an all-afternoon event for the eclipse and interacted with the remote team throughout the eclipse.
 
 
THE ART AND SCIENCE OF CELESTIAL CARTOGRAPHY
 
Jon W. Elvert
3526 Bon Sejour Avenue
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70820
jelvert1@gmail.com
 
Abstract: During the 17th and 18th centuries, celestial mapmakers often recorded objects on their charts not really knowing what those objects actually were. In 1690 the famous English astronomer John Flamsteed recorded the star “34 Tauri” into his chart, but this “star” was later discovered to be the planet Uranus. This paper uses early, artistic celestial charts to identify modern day astronomical objects incorrectly recorded by earlier cartographers/ astronomers. Close examination of earlier celestial maps can be used to help students connect art with science, as well as lead to citizen science projects.
 
 
INSPIRING THE NEXT GENERATION WITH LIMITED RESOURCES IN AN INCREASINGLY TECHNOLOGICAL WORLD
 
Paulette Epstein
Michigan Science Center
5020 John R St
Detroit, Michigan 48202
Paulette.Epstein@mi-sci.org
 
Abstract: With advances in technology, it is becoming more difficult to keep a person’s attention. How do inspire the next generation and hold their attention, especially without fulldome projection? This paper will discuss how we can use the limited resources that we have as traditional systems by creating engaging and interactive experiences.
 
 
ABRAMS PLANETARIUM GAME NIGHT
 
John French
Abrams Planetarium
755 Science Road
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
frenchj@msu.edu
 
Abstract: This paper is about Abrams Planetarium’s first ever “Game Night”. Game Night was held in March of 2017. Three video games were played on the planetarium dome. The Games were Space Invasion, Xur, and Snice. Space Invasion comes preinstalled on Digistar 5. Xur and Snice were created by Markus Schack and his students at the Mediendom in Kiel Germany.
 
 
THE POWER OF THE INTROVERT IN YOUR PLANETARIUM CLASSROOM
 
Drew Gilmore
Adventure Science Center
800 Fort Negley Blvd
Nashville, Tennessee 37203
dotsandlines@gmail.com
 
Patricia Seaton
H B Owens Science Center
9601 Greenbelt Road
Lanham, Maryland 20706
pxts13@yahoo.com
 
Abstract: Today’s classroom environment tends to lean towards group assignments and group work. We’ve been part of group assignments where that one person seems to dominate naturally, often unwittingly. In our planetarium environment, I’m sure we all quickly pick out that “one kid” who has all the answers. But what about the introvert? Research shows that solitude is good for creativity and productivity. In our planetarium classroom, we probably don’t have the luxury of time to allow for much solitude. This talk explores strategies such as “wait time” and “think time” to allow our introverts as well as extroverts to successfully participate in our planetarium experience. Presented by Introvert Drew Gilmore and Extrovert Patty Seaton.
 
 
SO YOU THINK YOU WANT TO HOST A MULTI-REGION PLANETARIUM CONFERENCE
 
Anna Rebecca Green
James S McDonnell Planetarium
Saint Louis Science Center
5050 Oakland Avenue
Saint Louis, Missouri 63110
Anna.Green@slsc.org
 
Abstract: Hosting a regional planetarium conference is a large undertaking for whoever decides they are ready to take on the responsibility. Hosting a non-IPS, multi-region planetarium conference has been a massive enterprise and interesting learning experience. From trying to include the culture of each region, to trying to make everyone happy, to balancing conference planning and one’s day job, to dealing with surprises, metaphorical fires, and the effort to maintain a personal life, the last three years of pros, cons, and learning lessons will be covered. Serving as a reference document, this paper will address what it took to make the Pleiades National Planetarium Conference happen.
 
 
WISDOM FOR EVENT PLANNING
 
Jim Greenhouse
New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science
1801 Mountain Rd NW
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104
jim greenhouse@state.nm.us
 
Abstract: All of you have planned events at your institutions, so I’m not going to attempt a comprehensive overview of event planning. Instead, I’m just going to share some tips I’ve learned over 35 years of working in informal education facilities. Several of these would have made my life a lot easier if I’d known them from the beginning!
 
 
FIRST GRADERS IN THE PLANETARIUM: THREE DIMENSIONAL TEACHING
 
Peggy Hernandez
Elgin School District U-46 Planetarium
c/o 355 E Chicago St
Elgin, Illinois 60120
peggyhernandez@u-46.org
 
Abstract: Six year olds need to move, talk, observe, think, listen, and practice (sometimes all at once!) to learn. I adjusted my 1st grade planetarium lesson using the fulldome program “The Moon” to accentuate the disciplinary core idea of celestial objects/movement, the crosscutting concept of patterns, and the scientific practice of observing, describing and recording the natural world. I designed and procured a notebook that goes home for practice and a set of flashcards for teachers. Teacher feedback and some informal achievement success will be shared. Limited samples of the notebook will be available.
 
 
HARRY POTTER SCIENCE SATURDAY
 
Carole Holmberg
Museum of York County
4621 Mt Gallant Road
Rock Hill, South Carolina 29732
CHolmberg@chmuseums.org
 
Abstract: A desire to create a live planetarium show featuring Jane Houston Jones’ “Harry Potter Objects” resulted in a 4-hour museum-wide extravaganza with 1500 guests and only Facebook advertising. Now, arguably our Museum’s most popular annual event, it proves that Harry Potter continues to be a draw for young people and adults alike.
 
 
TEACHING ABOUT INFRARED ASTRONOMY
 
Geoff Holt
Madison Metropolitan School District Planetarium
201 South Gammon Road
Madison, Wisconsin 53717
gholt@madison k12 wi us
 
Abstract: Observing in all wavelengths of light is vital to understanding the universe around us. Observing in the infrared helps us to study objects that often can’t be seen in visible light, revealing hidden star clusters embedded in nebulae, hidden stages of star formation, and more. The NASA/DLR SOFIA Observatory and the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope are a couple of relevant instruments. This paper will demonstrate the importance of infrared astronomy using relatively inexpensive equipment, including an infrared camera for $250, which attaches to your phone.
 
 
DEVELOPING NEW NGSS-ALIGNED, LIVE, INTERACTIVE SCHOOL SHOWS AT THE CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
 
Mary Holt
M. Josh Roberts
Dan Tell
Morrison Planetarium
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr
San Francisco, California 94118
mholt@calacademy org
mroberts@calacdemy org
dtell@calacademy org
 
Abstract: With California’s adoption of NGSS and major updates to Morrison Planetarium’s hardware and projection systems in 2016, the planetarium staff made necessary updates to their school offerings. In collaboration with the Academy’s education experts, technical staff and planetarium show presenters developed new programs incorporating the science standards and best practices in interaction strategies for student learning, while maximizing utilization of the dome environment, to create an exciting, engaging, and relevant show driven by current solar system science.
 
 
CONCERTS UNDER THE STARS
 
Emily Hromi
Grand Rapids Public Museum
272 Pearl Street NW
Grand Rapids, Michigan 49504
ehromi@grpm.org
 
Abstract: In early 2017, the Grand Rapids Public Museum’s Roger B. Chaffee Planetarium launched its pilot run of Concerts Under the Stars, a series of live music performances accompanied by live visuals on the dome. This highly successful concert series challenged both the skills of Chaffee Planetarium staff and the public’s perception of the planetarium and how it could be used. This paper will discuss the various factors that went into planning and executing the first year of Concerts Under the Stars, important lessons we learned along the way, and our plans for the future.
 
 
BEYOND BRIGHTNESS AND CONTRAST
 
Chris Janssen
Planetarium of the Wausau School District
Wausau West High School
1200 West Wausau Avenue
Wausau, Wisconsin 54401
cjanssen@wausauschools.org
 
Abstract: I use three amazing ways to upgrade fulldome video content that make stunning results. I will share these ways using Adobe and some plugins to 1) FPS Upgrade—Make 24 or 30 fps content into 60 fps. Especially useful for older Imax to dome content. 2) High Dynamic Range—Adjust your content to compensate for the harsh dome cross talk and/or lower native contrast projection systems. 3) Resolution Upgrade—some content was only rendered in 2K (or lower) resolution but is irreplaceable for your facility, so upgrade it to 4K instead.
 
 
UPDATE ON THE NEW BELL MUSEUM + PLANETARIUM
 
Sarah Komperud
Sally Brummel
Bell Museum + Planetarium
10 Church St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Komp0030@umn.edu
sbrummel@umn.edu
 
Abstract: Coming in summer 2018 to the St. Paul campus of the University of Minnesota, the new Bell Museum + Planetarium brings together science, art, and the environment with a unique Minnesota perspective. Our new home features a 16-meter digital planetarium, high-tech exhibits, our famous wildlife dioramas, outdoor learning experiences, and more. This presentation will feature the latest updates on our program development and equipment installation.
 
 
PLANETARIUM COMMUNITY COLLABORATIONS—BUILDING AUDIENCES AND EXPANDING HORIZONS
 
Shawn Laatsch
Emera Astronomy Center
University of Maine
167 Rangeley Road
Orono, Maine 04469
shawn.laatsch@maine.edu
 
Abstract: Expanding and diversifying audiences is a key concern for many planetariums. This paper will share ways to build community relationships to create new programming opportunities for domes, from science lectures utilizing university connections, to working with the local public library, to ticket partnerships, and many additional options will be explored. What makes a good partnership? How can existing content be leveraged to your advantage for partnerships? What are some ways to leverage local media for promotion partnerships? Emera Astronomy Center will share some of its most recent partnerships and their outcomes as examples of community collaborations.
 
 
DOMECASTING AND STREAMING THE KAVLI LECTURE SERIES
 
Patrick McPike
Adler Planetarium
1300 South Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60605
pmcpike@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: Video streaming is becoming commonplace in the fast-paced mass media market. The digital planetarium has a unique opportunity to take advantage of this new wave of streaming and domecasting and expand our reach to a broader audience, well beyond the walls of the physical planetarium. We can connect planetaria all across the world and share a single experience in real-time or connect single users from dome to VR. At the Adler Planetarium we have been creating a series of high quality fulldome lectures with the Kavli Foundation that are taking advantage of domecasting and 360 streaming technologies to further our goal of immersing people in science education. We will share the results from this lecture series and look at what the future of domecasting and streaming planetarium content might look like.
 
 
BUILDING THE LARGEST PLANETARIUM IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE
 
Patrick McQuillan
Liberty Science Center
222 Jersey City Blvd
Jersey City, New Jersey 07305
pmquillan@lsc.org
 
Abstract: The dome IMAX Theater at the Liberty Science Center was installed in 1993. It was purely a film IMAX Theater with no other audiovisual equipment. Given the impending demise of celluloid film products, Liberty Science Center needed to upgrade the capabilities of the IMAX Theater. The move to a digital theater was expanded to a digital planetarium and giant film theater upon the discovery that our 27-meter dome would be the largest planetarium in the Western Hemisphere when renovations were complete.
 
 
DEVELOPING THE TO-NIGHT SHOW AT THE EMERA ASTRONOMY CENTER
 
Scott Mitchell
Emera Astronomy Center
167 Rangeley Rd
Orono, Maine 04473
Scott.a.mitchell1701@gmail.com
 
Abstract: The To-Night Show at the Emera Astronomy Center is a parody of contemporary late-night talk shows, drawing inspiration from programs like The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Late Night with Seth Meyers, and The Daily Show. The show focuses on astronomy and other science news to keep visitors up to date on current events. This is presented in the form of an all-live show that can be re-run and updated to feature the most recent announcements, missions, and news. Most planetarium programs cover wide-ranging topics, phenomena, and history, but leave it to the presenter to shoehorn in current events into short live segments before or after the main part of the show. In its most recent iteration, the To- Night Show consists of a monologue of brief headlines paired with jokes, in depth desk pieces focusing on more notable recent events, audience participation games, guest interviews with characters played by student staff, and field pieces where staff can interview people on the street or report “live” from somewhere significant. Each segment is laced with humor to keep the show entertaining and prevent it from becoming a normal tedious news broadcast. The show that we have created is a product of the hard work of student staff learning as they go to create graphics, jokes, audio, interviews, video, and physical set pieces to bring together an entertaining and informative program that has been met with enthusiasm from the community. The work to develop this kind of program is excellent for involving student workers, costs very little, and can be a valuable part of a planetarium’s repertoire.
 
 
CHANGING HORSES MID-STREAM? WHAT HORSE... WHERE?
 
Jordan Mogerman
James S McDonnell Planetarium
Saint Louis Science Center
5050 Oakland Ave
St Louis, Missouri 63110
Jordan.Mogerman@slsc.org
 
Abstract: Changing one’s career can be a daunting endeavor, especially in middle age or later. This is my story of career change at the age of 51, with advice and suggestions to help others who may be considering a similar alteration to their life’s course.
 
 
BEYOND THE ‘SHOW’: THE FULL PLANETARIUM EXPERIENCE
 
Mike Murray
Delta College Planetarium & Learning Center
100 Center Avenue
Bay City, Michigan 48708
mikemurray@delta.edu
 
Abstract: To achieve maximum impact and encourage repeat visitation, the modern planetarium experience can go far beyond the playback element. The ability to combine real-time content with live interaction can do wonders for giving audiences that unique and unexpected “wow factor” and inspiration. A personalized and visual introduction provides context for why the immersive experience is so unique—without it, people aren’t sure what to expect and may just assume you are a “movie in the round.” Adding also a live “hot topics and current events” section to public shows offers an opportunity to demonstrate relevance and human enthusiasm that audiences will remember. In this talk we will outline a variety of presentation elements used at the Delta College Planetarium to improve the visitor experience.
 
 
COSMIC CONVERSATIONS: WILL AUDIENCE MEMBERS TALK TO EACH OTHER?
 
Morgan Rehnberg
Fort Worth Museum of Science and History
1600 Gendy St
Fort Worth, Texas 76107
MRehnberg@fwmsh.org
 
Abstract: What happens when a planetarium show ends? Often, the audience leaves. Sometimes, they get a chance to ask questions first. Both options reinforce a top-down learning model in which knowledge flows in one direction: from the “expert” staff to the viewer. This paper discusses Above & Beyond: Cosmic Conversations, a project that attempted to place presenters and visitors on a more level footing. Instead of fielding questions from the audience, the presenter charged the guests with answering a question themselves and engaging each other in response. I will discuss the format of the approach and explore the benefits and difficulties of this method.
 
 
3D PRINTED FILAR MICROMETER FOR AMATEURS AND ASTRONOMY EDUCATION
 
Emily Rull
Strickler Planetarium at Olivet Nazarene University
Department of Chemistry and Geosciences
1 University Avenue
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914
Emily.Rull777@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Using resources from the Scientific Revolution alongside designs from the 1980s, I designed and 3-D printed a filar micrometer for use in measuring the separation and position angle of double stars. I am using the filar micrometer, a telescope, and lamps to model a double star to calibrate the filar micrometer. This calibration will be turned into a lab procedure for ONU’s Astronomy course. This process is an effort to make the expensive and precise filar micrometer accessible to the amateur astronomers who are leading the research on double stars by observing and measuring their orbits.
 
 
THE EFFECT OF MACULAR DEGENERATION ON APPRECIATION OF THE TOTAL ECLIPSE
 
Sheldon Schafer
Adjunct Faculty, Physics Dept
Bradley University
1501 Bradley Ave
Peoria, Illinois 61625
sls@fsmail.bradley.edu
 
Planetarium Director Emeritus
Peoria Riverfront Museum
Peoria, Illinois 61602
 
Abstract: Macular Degeneration is “...a degenerative condition affecting the central part of the retina (the macula), resulting in distortion or loss of central vision. It occurs especially in older adults.” Age-related macular degeneration affects more than 1.75 million individuals in the United States. Owing to the rapid aging of the US population, this number will increase to almost 3 million by 2020. The subject of this research, a woman with moderately advanced macular degeneration, will have been given in advance a series of questions highlighting the eclipse phenomena that could be observed or experienced, and asked to record her responses as the eclipse progresses. This paper will explore those responses and how her visual impairment affected her appreciation of the event.
 
 
STUDENT DEVELOPED SHOWS AND CONTENT SHARING
 
Sara Schultz
Boston Heaford
Minnesota State University Moorhead Planetarium
1104 7th Ave S
Moorhead, Minnesota 56563
schultz@mnstate.edu
 
Abstract: Two undergraduate students and I have undertaken the task of expanding our live show content by developing shows on topics ranging from the moons of the solar system to the science behind Interstellar (and many things in between). We would like to share our experiences, struggles, and successes. We will discuss the content we have developed and our future plans for continuing and expanding this to the rest of the planetarium community. We would love to hear what others are doing in this area and start a conversation about how we can really share our stories across sites and technology.
 
 
BUILDING TEACHER SELF-EFFICACY THROUGH PROFESSIONAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
 
Patricia Seaton
(in collaboration with Virginia Fulton)
Howard B Owens Science Center
9601 Greenbelt Road
Lanham, Maryland 20706
pxts13@yahoo.com
 
Abstract: At the Howard B. Owens Science Center for Prince George’s County Public Schools, our teaching staff not only designs and implements STEM programs for Elementary through High School students, we also facilitate Professional Learning Opportunities (PLOs) for teachers. In the past, these experiences have tended to be “one and done” programs—one day jam packed with content and information on how to bring students to the science center for programs. However, working with our Master Teacher Virginia Fulton, we are changing the way we offer PLOs. They are now multi-day sessions with different expectations from the teachers in how they participate, collaborate, and infuse the content and materials into their classrooms. Creating a collaborative network with shared accountability we designed a multi-session plan that culminates with immediate use in the classroom. I followed this model under a grant with the New Horizons mission to Pluto, culminating in teachers and students presenting mini-models of flybys through the solar system using software purchased through the grant. Explore this model with us and implement similar successful programs at your own institution.
 
 
NO DOME LEFT BEHIND
 
Sharon Shanks
Editor, IPS Planetarian
Retired from Ward Beecher Planetarium
Youngstown State University
Youngstown, Ohio 44555
sharon.shanks@gmail.com
 
Tom Arnold
Kirkpatrick Planetarium
Science Museum Oklahoma
200 Remington Place
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73111
tarnold@sciencemuseumok.org
 
Ron Walker
The Star Barn Planetarium
P.O. Box 161
Cave Creek, Arizona 85327
thestarbarn@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Technology has improved life for many of us, but it has made life difficult for others. There are the traditional domes that cannot afford or deliberately decide not to adopt fulldome. What can the planetarium community do to make sure every dome makes the best use of the tools that it has? At the same time, what can we do to keep good planetarium tools out of landfills? And, connected with this, we need to reach out to the reclusive planetarians who do not know about—or who think they don’t need—the assistance that the affiliates here at the Pleiades Conference can provide them. This is both a short paper and an introduction to a larger effort to gather the minds and ideas of the planetarium community.
 
 
ACTIVITIES FOR ENGAGING AUDIENCES IN PLANETARY SCIENCE
 
Christine Shupla
Lunar and Planetary Institute
3600 Bay Area Blvd
Houston, Texas 77058
shupla@lpi.usra.edu
 
Abstract: Want to find new fun planetary science activities beyond the traditional crater boxes and Oreo cookie Moon phases? There are a variety of new models and revisions of existing activities that can be used in the museum, out-of-school, and classroom settings with children and tweens, using simple everyday materials. Come discover some of the ideas and lessons available freely online.
 
 
SHARING ONGOING PLANETARY EXPLORATION
 
Christine Shupla
Lunar and Planetary Institute
3600 Bay Area Blvd
Houston, Texas 77058
shupla@lpi.usra.edu
 
Abstract: Planetary scientists continue to make amazing discoveries through the robotic exploration of our solar system. We can engage our audiences with these new discoveries, particularly as they relate to the key concepts in planetary science: our search for habitable environments and the conditions for life, and understanding of how planets, moons, and asteroids form and evolve. Come learn how to connect with planetary scientists and their research and visual data, on topics including the Moon’s formation, the migration of the outer planets, early conditions on Mars, the late heavy bombardment and its possible influence of life on Earth, and more.
 
 
THE PLATFORM AGNOSTIC PLANETARIUM
 
Mike Smail
Adler Planetarium
1300 S Lake Shore Dr
Chicago, Illinois 60605
msmail@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: Historically, planetarium identities have been inexorably linked to their projection system’s manufacturer. For better or worse, this has a noticeable effect on our ability to reach our audiences. Now, it’s getting easier and more straightforward to install multiple planetarium platforms on a single computer system. Learn about challenges, successes, and ways you can make your planetarium platform agnostic.
 
 
CREATING A 100-SHOW ROSTER
 
Dale W. Smith
BGSU Planetarium
Department of Physics & Astronomy
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio 43403
dwsmith@bgsu.edu
 
Abstract: Since acquiring Spitz SciDome at BGSU, we now have more than 100 shows available in the system, including over 30 fulldome shows and about 75 classic shows, in addition to live interactive and workshop-style programs for school groups. I will describe how this extensive roster was created.
 
 
USERS’S GUIDE FOR IMPORTING SLIDE-RICH LEGACY SHOWS INTO SCIDOME
 
Dale W. Smith
Bowling Green State University Planetarium
dwsmith@bgsu.edu
 
 
CONNECTING CURRICULUM TO PLANETARIUM PROGRAMMING
 
Tiffany Stone Wolbrecht
Ward Beecher Planetarium
Youngstown State University
One University Plaza
Youngstown, Ohio 44555
tiffany.wolbrecht@gmail.com
 
Abstract: While most planetariums host field trips for schoolchildren, they are not required to provide lesson plans, content standards, assessment practices, or supplemental materials for the programming they offer. The public school teachers that bring their students to our facilities, however, live and breathe this world. This paper discusses how and why it is important to bridge the magic of informal education in a planetarium to the rigid and sometimes frustrating structure of public school curriculum.
 
 
THE INTERNATIONAL PLANETARIUM SOCIETY’S DATA TO DOME INITIATIVE
 
Mark SubbaRao
Adler Planetarium
1300 S Lake Shore Drive
Chicago Illinois, 60505
msubbarao@adlerplanetarium.org
 
Abstract: The mission of the International Planetarium Society’s Science and Data Visualization Task Force is to streamline the process of going from data to dome, increasing the potential for scientific communication and storytelling in the planetarium. Over the past year this ‘Data to Dome’ initiative has made significant strides in advancing this mission. This article discusses professional development efforts, engagement with the scientific community, and the development of new community data standards. Finally, a vision is presented for the planetarium of the future. This ‘Just in Time’ planetarium can draw upon the entirety of the world’s scientific data, making it the ultimate platform for public communication of the latest scientific discoveries.
 
 
VISUALIZING THE ORION NEBULA
 
Frank Summers
Space Telescope Science Institute
3700 San Martin Dr
Baltimore, Maryland 21218
summers@stsci.edu
 
Abstract: The Orion Nebula is one of the crown jewels of the sky. As the nearest star-forming region covering the full range of stellar masses, it is one of the best studied and most informative of astronomical objects. Star and planetary system formation are revealed in more detail and beauty than on any other celestial site. We previously developed a 3D model of the 2006 Hubble view of Orion for an IMAX film, however, due to the contract terms of our collaborators, the frames were unavailable to planetariums and other venues. Recent efforts have re-worked and re-rendered the Orion model, and these new sequences will be distributed without restriction. Our presentation will describe the process and problems of creating this visualization for Ultra-High Definition movie, dome sequence, and Virtual Reality 360 experiences.
 
 
ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS FOR THE RIGHT LEARNERS
 
Carolyn Sumners
Houston Museum of Natural Science
5555 Hermann Park Drive
Houston, Texas 77030
csumners@hmns.org
 
Abstract: Pre-post assessments conducted in the dome, using clickers integrated into our Digistar operating system, show student concept mastery before and after a 40-minute interactive planetarium experience. Performances of 502 students from five schools with varying demographics (ethnicity, percentage of economically disadvantaged, percentage of English language learners, student mobility, and achievement on a standardized science test) indicate how these variables can affect student learning in a planetarium. Six core astronomy concepts were measured based on state and national standards. Time spent on presenting concepts and questioning students in the planetarium was also considered.
 
 
INTERACTION WITH CLICKERS IN THE DOME
 
Carolyn Sumners
Houston Museum of Natural Science
5555 Hermann Park Dr
Houston, Texas 77030
csumners@hmns.org
 
Abstract: The Burke Baker Planetarium of the Houston Museum of Natural Science (HMNS) has developed an interactive clicker technology with the assistance of Evans & Sutherland. Now audiences can use clickers with raised buttons to communicate with a Digistar 6 projection system. These clickers can tell the operator how to move a 360° dome image, from exploring outside and inside the International Space Station to walking through a natural bridge or flying out into the starfield. We also use these clickers for pre- and post- test evaluation of student concept acquisition and to have students respond to animations on the dome—predicting sequences and motions of celestial objects. Clicker responses also measure what we have taught and help us determine when learning occurs within a planetarium experience.
 
 
FOSTERING A QUESTIONING PUBLIC
 
Dayna Thompson
Charles W Brown Planetarium
Ball State University
2000 W Riverside Ave
Muncie, Indiana 47306
dlthompson3@bsu.edu
 
Abstract: With fake news evolving and becoming more prevalent, what can we do to help the public navigate the information they are exposed to? In many planetarium presentations we help without realizing it by teaching the characteristics and abilities that are associated with being a scientist. How can we continue to go further with our presentations to help better prepare the next generation of scientists and foster a questioning public? I will share experiences and techniques that have been used in the dome for this cause with the help of feedback from the participants of the 2017 meeting of the Live, Interactive Planetarium Symposium (LIPS).
 
 
CHAOS IN THE PLANETARIUM
 
Arylyn Trout
Jacob Salis
Emily Porter
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
169 Cooper Hall
Edinboro, Pennsylvania 16444
eupchaos@gmail.com
 
Abstract: Cooper Hall’s Ambassadors of Sciences (C.H.A.O.S.) is an Edinboro University-based organization that provides the public with tours throughout our planetarium and museum. As a student-run organization, our mission is to teach future generations about the opportunities in and the relevance of the STEM fields. This paper is designed to illustrate how other planetariums and museums can replicate similar programs, like ours, at colleges and universities
 
 
PREVIEW OF EVENING PLANETARY EVENTS, 2018-2020
 
Robert C. Victor
Abrams Planetarium
Michigan State University
755 Science Road
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
rvictormi@earthlink.net
 
Abstract: In 2018, the three bright outer planets pass opposition within 79 days, shortest interval since 1984. Dates are Jupiter on May 8, Saturn on June 27, and Mars at perihelic opposition, closest since August 2003, on July 26. Venus passes inferior conjunction on Oct. 26, so it will display its most striking half and crescent phases to evening viewers from August into early October. Summer and early autumn 2018 will be an excellent time to host sessions to view all four showpiece planets! Whenever you show Jupiter and Saturn, be sure to mention their spectacular pairing of December 21, 2020, when they’ll appear just 0.1 degree apart, closer than on any occasion since 1623, during Galileo’s lifetime.
 
 
JUST GIVE ‘EM THE FACTS?
 
Dave Weinrich
Minnesota State University Moorhead, Retired
S250 State Rd 35 S
Nelson, Wisconsin 54756
weinrich@mnstate.edu
 
Abstract: In today’s era of “fake news” and “alternative facts,” planetarians sometimes encounter people who do not believe commonly accepted scientific truths, for example that the Earth is spherical. How can two people look at the same facts and come to different conclusions? Is there anything that we can do to persuade our audiences, besides just stating the facts?
 
 
RADIO ASTRONOMY IN A TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE
 
Christi Whitworth
Lebby Moran
Gary Lazich

Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute
1 PARI Drive
Rosman, North Carolina 28772
cwhitworth@pari.edu
 
Abstract: Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) experienced a total solar eclipse on August 21, 2017 and gathered data from multiple radio telescopes observing at 1420 Mhz, a neutral hydrogen wavelength. This is the first time the shadow of the Moon has crossed a radio telescope facility and the data will be exciting even if it is as expected. Watching the Sun is always an exciting application of learning to operate a radio telescope. This data will be shared by educators and scientists who work with PARI. It will also be integrated into the current education programs, including the planetarium programs offered in PARI’s Adventure Dome. Topics that will include this new data are radio astronomy, radio observations, and radio telescope training for student research use.
 
 
PLANETARIUM PLATFORM AGNOSTICISM (CONT’D)
 
Ryan Wyatt
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive
San Francisco, California 94118
rwyatt@calacademy.org
 
Abstract: In refreshing technology for Morrison Planetarium at the California Academy of Sciences, we executed a balancing act of how to improve the brightness, resolution, color, and contrast of an eight-year-old fulldome display—while involving stakeholders from planetarium presenters and production specialists to the institution’s Senior Leadership Team and Board of Trustees. This talk will share successes and shortcomings, reviewing the processes we put in place as well as the compromises we ultimately faced to keep the project on time and on budget.
 
 
WHAT IS VIZ?
 
Ryan Wyatt
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive
San Francisco, California 94118
rwyatt@calacademy.org
 
Abstract: The term “science visualization” gets bandied about quite a bit, and in the new “Data to Dome” era, we need to give thought to how we represent data visually in planetariums. This talk reviews some basics of visualization and advocates careful consideration of the visual language in which we present content to our audiences. In particular, how do we avoid confusing and confounding our audiences by assuming the visual vernacular of the sciences—which may well be unfamiliar to the uninitiated? The talk recommends specific resources and visualization best practices.
 
 
Posters:
 
 
CONNECTED EYEWEAR FOR ACCESSIBILITY
 
Christelle Barclay
Universcience, la Cité des sciences et de l’industrie
30 avenue Corentin Cariou
75019 Paris, FRANCE
christelle.barclay@universcience.fr
 
Abstract: Since July 2017 the 8K Planetarium of the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie in Paris has developed state-of-the-art augmented reality eyeglasses for the deaf and hearing-impaired audience. No more text overlay or videos with sign language directly on the dome. These smart glasses allow the viewer to watch the show like everyone else, as they superimpose subtitles or the image of a sign language translator while the viewer can freely move his head to watch any part of the dome. For total immersion with absolutely no light pollution, these smart glasses are easy to use as they synchronize with the astronomic simulator.
 
 
TALES OF A TIME TRAVELER
 
Tony Butterfield
Houston Museum of Natural Science
5555 Hermann Park Drive
Houston, Texas 77030
tonyb@hmns.org
 
Abstract: Using hundreds of real photos, I transformed the Pantheon into a time-travelling spaceship to create scenes for “Tales of a Time Traveler”. We utilized time-lapse fisheye photography, taken by Adam Barnes, of the Sundial to show how the Sun travels across the sky and the changing shadow. Time-lapse fisheye photography on a 10-foot long rail to capture dinosaurs in the paleo hall of the Houston Museum of Natural Science.
 
 
THE PLANETARIUM OF THE FUTURE: AN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COMPETITION
 
Christina Ciardullo
Space Exploration Architecture
313 West 75th Street, #4A
New York, NY 10023
christina@spacexarch.com
 
Margarita Calero
Ennead Architects
 
with
Andrea Verini & Eloise Carr
Eleven Magazine
 
Abstract: The Planetarium is truly an iconic architectural experience that has persisted almost a century. The dome theater, an invention, a tool, a classroom, is truly a transformational design experience. But with new science, and new methods of communication, we asked ourselves—what is it we are trying to communicate in astronomy today, and how might we re-imagine this incredibly powerful experience. With a 2015 grant from the Middle Atlantic Planetarium Society, in collaboration with Eleven Magazine, we created an international architectural ideas competition on the planetarium. The competition invites designers from around the world to submit ideas on the future of this architectural icon. We’ve assembled a leading interdisciplinary jury, influential to planetarium design in industry today, with astrophysicists, science educators, exhibition designers, visual artists, and architects from NASA, Caltech, ESO, SETI, Ralph Applbaum Associates, and Ennead Architects to help us evaluate the entries and the winner is to be chosen in October 2017. This project is a unique opportunity to take a moment to step back and think a bit out of the box on the role of architecture, digital media in communicating science. It gives designers, as well as scientists and educators, a chance to think collaboratively about the experience and inspire a world where design and science are more integrated and to engage critical questions such as the role between immersive media and physical architecture.
 
 
ILLUMINATING NORTHERN LIGHTS
 
Jean Creighton
Danielle Devasto
Sam Gallagher

Physics Department
P O Box 413
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) Planetarium
jcreight@uwm.edu
 
Abstract: This pilot study looks at best practices in explaining astronomical concepts to a broad audience during live planetarium programs specifically using analogies, gestures, and animations to explain the electron transitions that are responsible for the creation of aurorae. We evaluated the public’s understanding with questionnaires. Our findings are applicable to both live and pre-recorded settings.
 
 
FINDING ACTIVITIES FOR PLANETARIUMS
 
Alan Gould
Lawrence Hall of Science
University of California Berkeley
1 Centennial Rd
Berkeley, California 94720-5200
adgould@comcast.net
 
Abstract: The Live Interactive Planetarium Symposiums (LIPS) provide great forums for sharing of activities that make for exciting planetarium programs. There is a growing body of websites where documentation for such activities are available for free: LIPS website, Planetarium Activities for Successful Shows (PASS), International Planetarium Society (IPS), and a number of regionals’ websites.
 
 
SEEING IN THE DARK
DEBUNKING MYTHOLOGIES ABOUT HOW WE SEE IN PLANETARIUMS
 
Philip Groce
Helping Planetariums Succeed, LLC
619 Orange Street
Macon, Georgia 31201
hps4075@bellsouth.net
 
Abstract: This presentation attempts to define how we see and perceive images in the planetarium environment. I will address the characteristics of visual acuity as it applies to images produced by Star Projectors and Fulldome Systems.
 
 
IMPACT FEATURES IN THE UNITED STATES
 
David E. Hostetter
Lafayette Science Museum
433 Jefferson Street
Lafayette, Louisiana 70601
dhostetter@lafayettela.gov
 
Abstract: An annotated directory of impact features in the United States, with maps and references.
 
 
IPS ONLINE SEARCHABLE DIRECTORY
 
Adam Leis
(Formerly Bowling Green State University)
13154 Jerry City Rd
Cygnet, Ohio 41413
adam.m.leis@gmail.com
 
Abstract: This web application is an online directory providing information (institution, address, dome details, etc.) on the world’s planetariums. It is dynamic, responsive, and accessible from a wide variety of devices and modern web browsers.
 
 
SOUND UP! CALLING ALL LISTENERS
 
Charlie Morrow
Chair, IPS Immersive Sound Committee
Morrow Sound
1961 Roaring Brook Road
Barton, Vermont 05822
 
Abstract: Sound is an important part of life and of planetarium shows. Sound in life is immersive in that we can instantly locate the source of a sound and respond. Planetariums have a wide variety of sound solutions but none that immersive. Our committee is asking about the old methods and about the future of sound in virtual and dome worlds.
 
 
THE TRAVELLING TELESCOPE AFRICA LTD.
 
Susan Murabana Oduori
Daniel Chu Owen
The Travelling Telescope
Orchid Apartments, No 8
P O Box 957 00517
Nairobi, KENYA
smurabana@travellingtelescope.co.uk
chu@travellingtelescope.co.uk
 
Abstract: The Traveling Telescope promotes science and technology in Africa. We have reached more than 40,000 students in hundreds of schools in Kenya. We have a mobile planetarium, a 12-inch reflecting telescope, and other interactive devices.
 
 
TEACHING USING IMMERSION—EXPLAINING MAGNETISM AND ECLIPSES IN A PLANETARIUM DOME
 
Patricia H. Reiff
Rice University
Department of Physics and Astronomy
6100 Main St, MS 108
Houston, Texas 77005
reiff@rice.edu
 
Carolyn Sumners
Houston Museum of Natural Science
5555 Herman Park Dr
Houston, Texas 77004
csumners@hmns.org
 
Abstract: Previously we have shown that three-dimensional concepts are more readily learned in a three-dimensional context. Although VR headsets are growing in popularity, they only provide a quite limited field of view, and each person in a group may be viewing a different direction or a different time in the visualization. By using instead a fullsphere movie (VR360) in a planetarium dome instead of a headset, you can “share the VR”® and specify which half of the sphere your audience is looking at. You can pause the movie, ask questions using a clicker system, display the results, and move on if the subject is mastered or explain more if items are not understood. This paper shows the results of teaching magnetism in a dome theater, showing that both students and teachers nearly double their understanding of magnetism topics after one viewing. We also created seven animations explaining eclipses that were distributed free to nearly 200 planetariums. Listing of concepts learned by teachers in our live eclipse program are shown.
 
 
THE UNIVERSE IN MUSIC—A STEM PRESENTATION
 
Jonn Serrie
April Whitt
Future Music
900 Colony Creek Dr
Lawrenceville, Georgia 30043
jserrie@bellsouth.net
 
Abstract: “Electronic music was made possible in the laboratories of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. I see a core connection between electronic music and STEM.” Jonn Serrie
 
 
THE LIBRARY TELESCOPE PROGRAM
 
James Small
St Louis Astronomical Society
Pattonville Heights Observatory and Planetarium
13128 Cozyhill Drive
St Louis, Missouri 63122
jrsmall@earthlink.net
 
Abstract: In 2008, the New Hampshire Astronomical Society began a program whereby telescopes were made available in local libraries to be checked out by patrons just like a book. The goal is “To help foster scientific literacy, stimulate an interest in astronomy, and provide people who have never looked through a telescope the chance to experience the excitement that comes from discovery.” The St. Louis Astronomical Society implemented the Library Telescope Program in the St. Louis region in 2014. Both groups have now placed telescopes in over 100 libraries each and continue to assist other organizations in starting their own Library Telescope Program. It is the purpose of this presentation to help other organizations begin their own Library Telescope Program and answer key questions about implementation including obtaining and modifying the telescopes, training volunteers and library staff, placing the telescopes in libraries, maintaining the telescopes after placement, and offering support.
 
 
1ST TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE ON THE 1ST DAY OF SCHOOL
 
Krista Murnane Testin
Mallory Kountze Planetarium
University of Nebraska at Omaha, DSC 129
6601 Dodge Street
Omaha, Nebraska 68124
ktestin@unoamah.edu
 
Abstract: August 21st, 2017 was the first total solar eclipse experienced in Nebraska since 1954. This poster presents an overview of site and equipment selection, a discussion of restrictions and the outcomes of the event. One key restriction was the fact that the eclipse coincided with the first day of fall semester. The skills acquired and lessons learned will be used and improved upon to provide events through the Mallory Kountze Planetarium.
 
 
LIBRARY PARTNERSHIP: STARS AND STORIES!
 
Sarah Twidal
Fort Worth Museum of Science and History
Noble Planetarium
1600 Gendy Street
Fort Worth, Texas 76107
stwidal@fwmsh.org
 
Abstract: In this poster we would like to talk about our Stars and Stories program as an encouragement for those in the planetarium field to find connections within their local areas and increase attendance to their shows and programs. We want to encourage it as a mutually beneficial program concept, ensuring both partners in the arrangement receive something for which they could not have afforded to pay.
 
 
SMALL EXHIBIT SPACE, BIG ACTIVITIES
 
Sarah Vise
Charles W Brown Planetarium at Ball State University
2000 West Riverside Avenue
Ball State University
Muncie, Indiana 47306
svise@bsu.edu
 
Abstract: Since we do not have much space for permanent exhibits at the Brown Planetarium, we offer “mobile” activities instead. This poster will include an overview of the many activities we have available for planetarium guests. It will also include one that I helped design for visitors in the planetarium to explore.
 
 
FERNBANK’S ANNIVERSARY ECLIPSE
 
April Whitt
Fernbank Science Center
156 Heaton Park Drive NE
Atlanta, GA 30307
April.whitt@fernbank.edu
 
Abstract: Before answering machines, cell phones, text messaging, and Apollo astronauts on the Moon, Fernbank Science Center opened its doors to the students, teachers, and general public of the DeKalb County School System. August 21, 2017 saw crowds gathered for a celebratory solar eclipse.
 
 
THE BUFFALO ECLIPSE CONSORTIUM: LESSONS LEARNED AND LOOKING AHEAD TO TOTALITY IN 2024
 
Kevin K. Williams
Whitworth Ferguson Planetarium
Buffalo State College
Buffalo, New York 14222
 
Abstract: How a consortium of Buffalo area organizations worked together for the 2017 solar eclipse.
 
 
EVALUATING THE IMPACT OF LIVE PRESENTATION
 
Ryan Wyatt
Akemi Mease
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive
San Francisco, California 94118
rwyatt@calacademy.org
amease@calacademy.org
 
Abstract: The California Academy of Sciences incorporates live presentation into all Morrison Planetarium programming, including otherwise pre-recorded shows produced by the Academy‘s Visualization Studio. In spring 2017, we worked with an outside contractor to evaluate the efficacy of live segments from our 2015 show Habitat Earth. The live content incorporated specific messages about sustainability including a call to action for audiences, but our learnings have broad application to a variety of planetarium programs. This poster will review the evaluation’s methods and instruments as well as its results.
 
 
Workshops and Panel Discussions:
 
 
MINI LIPS
 
Karrie Berglund
Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc
817 Pacific Avenue
Bremerton, Washington 98337
karrie@DigitalisEducation.com
 
Abstract: This one-day LIPS (Live Interactive Planetarium Symposium)-style workshop will provide a glimpse of what the full LIPS covers. LIPS specifically focuses on live, interactive planetarium lessons: connecting with your audience, enhancing performance skills, classroom management techniques, sample activities; etc. It is applicable to planetarians using digital systems or starballs, in portable or fixed domes.
 
 
COMMUNICATING CONTROVERSY IN THE DOME
 
Carolyn Collins Petersen, co-moderator
Loch Ness Productions
P O Box 924
Nederland, Colorado 80466
carolyn@lochnessproductions com
 
Dan Tell, co-moderator and panelist
Morrison Planetarium
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Drive
San Francisco, California 94118
 
Julieta Cristina Aguilera-Rodriguez, panelist
University of Plymouth, UK
 
Michael McConville, panelist
Emil Buehler Perpetual Trust Planetarium
Seminole State College
100 Weldon Boulevard
Sanford, Florida 32773
 
Joyce Towne, panelist
Spitz, Inc
700 Brandwine Dr
Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania 19317
 
Abstract: This panel discussion focused on the dome community’s responsibilities when it comes to teaching (and/or debunking) such legitimate science topics as climate change as well as being confronted with such unscientific ones as at earth theories and creationism. Panelists presented a spectrum of views on how we can deal with these topics in our domes, presentations, and videos.
 
 
LET’S PLAY: INTERACTIVE GAMING IN THE PLANETARIUM
 
Talia Sepersky
Heather Fairweather
Charles Hayden Planetarium
Museum of Science
1 Science Park
Boston, Massachusetts 02114-1099
tsepersky@mos.org
hfairweather@mos.org
 
Abstract: In April 2016 the staff of the Charles Hayden Planetarium at the Museum of Science, Boston, attempted a new form of public event based around text-based adventure games. Using the game “Space Station” as our source material, we turned what is traditionally an entirely non-visual game into a unique immersive experience by creating fulldome visuals to match the game settings. This paper will describe what we did to create the visuals and how we used them on the dome. It will also describe the actual event in which we ran the game with the participation of a full planetarium audience and what we learned from this innovative evening in our dome.