Schedule

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Monday, October 12, 2020

Start TimeEnd Time
2:00 PM2:05 PMEasternPresident's Welcome
2:05 PM2:20 PMEasternIntroduction breakout rooms
2:20 PM2:25 PMEasternSponsor appreciation & sponsor hall familiarization
2:25 PM2:55 PMEastern

Paper Presentations

2:25 PM2:40 PMEasternJean Creighton — Stars Have Stories: Virtual Exploration of Stellar Properties
To address the needs of house-bound families last spring, I developed a series of programs about how we learn the physical properties of stars. The series “Stars Have Stories” was intended to engage a wide range of audiences. In this paper, I highlight aspects of the series that will demystify how astronomers understand the nature of stars.
2:40 PM2:55 PMEasternShannon Schmoll — 'Rabbit in the Moon and Other Tales of the Night Sky': A Collaboration
Over the course of two years the Abrams Planetarium and Wharton Center for the Performing Arts collaborated with storyteller LuAnn Adams to create a live, immersive, performance for children. The show featured stories from around the world that are related to the night sky along with original pieces. It was performed 11 times over the course of a week utilizing dome visualizations to complement Luann's energetic performance. The Wharton Center provided creative input, logistics, and financial backing. Luann provided the performance and choice of stories. The Abrams Planetarium provided the venue, programming, and behind the scenes work. Visuals were made using Digistar 6 and are available for anyone who would like to book the show.
2:55 PM3:00 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Seiler-Zeiss (Moon)
3:00 PM3:10 PMEasternBreak
3:10 PM3:40 PMEastern

Paper Presentations

3:10 PM3:25 PMEasternRenae Kerrigan — Big Astronomy: Educational Events and Activities for Your Audiences
Big Astronomy is a multifaceted project, funded by the National Science Foundation. By now, you are likely familiar with the bilingual planetarium film that has been released for free or very low cost, and is showing in theaters and virtually worldwide. But are you aware of the associated educational products freely available? Big Astronomy live events on social media can connect your audiences directly to STEM professionals working in remote observatories. The Astronomical Society of the Pacific has created toolkits of hands-on activities for use in museums and by amateur astronomers. Learn more about these show enhancements and how to become involved.
3:25 PM3:40 PMEasternSara Schultz — Asking the 'Right' Questions: Formative Assessment in the Interactive Planetarium
Questions are arguably the most powerful tool we, as planetarians, have to engage with and educate our audiences. We often use questions in a variety of ways: to set expectations, gauge interest, and determine pre-conceptions, among other things. Questions are at the core of an interactive planetarium presentation and are often used to engage the audience. However, those questions can also be an effective way of teaching and helping our audiences retain more of what we do with them in the limited time we have. In this presentation, I will share what I learned from my doctoral research on formative assessment in planetarium presentation recordings and where to go from here.
3:40 PM3:50 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Digitalis (Earth)
3:50 PM4:15 PMEasternSpecial Interest Groups
4:15 PM4:20 PMEasternBreak
4:20 PM4:25 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Chromacove (Moon)
4:25 PM4:55 PMEastern

Paper Presentations

4:25 PM4:40 PMEasternJulieta Aguilera — Direct experience biases and scientific visualizations in the Dome
A common question planetarians get when virtually traveling through the Universe across scales of space and time is whether what is being presented is 'real'. Scientific Visualization tools that include spatio-temporal navigation software present adjusted versions of reality that allow us to comprehend planetary, galactic and cosmic realms seamlessly. So seamlessly in fact that grand scales may be removed from our human experience altogether. On the other hand, we look at the Universe from our experience in the immediate planetary environment where we are, along with all the sensations and interactions with which we exist in the environment. In turn, our existence on Earth predispose each of us to bring our planetary experiences as kinds of biases to the cosmic data we seek to understand. This paper will both offer and brainstorm with attendees some approaches to the “real” question, and also strategies to maintain, reconnect and establish new connections between our direct experience and the scientific visualization techniques through which we explore the Universe. It will finally discuss how we need to spell out to the public the process we employ, as well as the inherent direct experience biases that are considered when we make spatial and temporal adjustments to scientific visualizations in order to achieve knowledge.
4:40 PM4:55 PMEasternDani LeBlanc, Dayna Thompson, Shannon Schmoll — The International Planetarium Society’s Climate Survey
The International Planetarium Community’s Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee works to develop a culture and climate throughout its activities where all community members experience a sense of belonging and engagement. In order to move us towards this goal, we need to understand the current climate and culture within the IPS. Therefore, a climate survey was created to help us understand people’s experiences within the community. The results of which will guide our work towards inclusive excellence moving forward. Learn about how the survey was developed, how it will be used, and how you can contribute to our community by taking the survey.

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Start TimeEnd Time
11:00 AM11:05 AMEasternWelcome and chat / Check poster presentations
11:05 AM11:35 AMEastern

Paper Presentations

11:05 AM11:20 AMEasternAnna Green, Jackie Baughman, Mike Smail — Staying Safe and Sane in the Dome and at Home
As planetarians we all love our jobs – sometimes to the point of giving more of ourselves to our domes than we have to give. Burnout caused by understaffing, a toxic work environment, the desire to take part in everything available at a conference, or a pandemic that is causing uncertainty for planetarians worldwide at work and at home; most of us may find ourselves in a similar situation at some point in our careers. This paper will provide different ways to work towards better mental (and physical) health in these situations, and also how to support staff and coworkers who may be struggling.
11:20 AM11:35 AMEasternBob Bonadurer — Virtual Universe: Staying Relevant on Covid Planet--Temporarily, Hopefully
We have all been hitchhiking a new path in the galaxy. This paper focuses in on some virtual methods that have been successful here at the Soref Planetarium in Milwaukee. Topping our list is the one-minute virtual video.
11:35 AM11:40 AMEasternSponsor Presentation: Adler (Moon)
11:40 AM12:05 PMEasternState Meetings
12:05 PM12:15 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: E&S (Earth)
12:15 PM12:50 PMEasternBreak for Lunch
12:50 PM12:55 PMEasternGroup Photo
12:55 PM1:00 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Laser Fantasy (Moon)
1:00 PM1:45 PMEasternInvited Talk: Patricia Moore — Returning to the Moon — NASA’s Artemis Program
NASA's Artemis Program will return the next man and the first woman to the Moon by 2024. Patricia Moore from NASA's Artemis Communication Team will discuss upcoming Artemis missions, share digital outreach resources, and answer questions from the audience.

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Start TimeEnd Time
5:00 PM5:05 PMEasternWelcome and chat / Check poster presentations
5:05 PM6:35 PMEasternWorkshops
6:35 PM6:45 PMEasternBreak
6:45 PM6:55 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Astro-Tec (Earth)
6:55 PM7:25 PMEastern

Paper Presentations

6:55 PM7:10 PMEasternMelanie Isenbarger, Caleb Whitcomb, Nicolette Terracciano, Alec Neal, Richard Gorby — The Constellation Crew at Ball State University
Hear from a close-knit group of Ball State students, who are used to working together on anything from homework assignments to research, about how they bring that experience to enrich our planetarium’s weekly virtual event.
7:10 PM7:25 PMEasternMary Holt — Creating COVID-Concurrent Cosmic Conversations
While the California Academy of Sciences has been closed for over six months, the planetarium team found various ways to adapt programming to an online environment. In addition to weekly planetarium programs covering Pre-K, Solar System, and night sky topics, the Morrison team began a weekly “expert talk”. Each week features a guest from outside the Academy, or an internal expert, to discuss their research or topics related to astronomy and planetariums. In this paper I will explore how the Morrison Team created this series, including who we reached out to and why, software we’ve used, and various logistical elements.
7:25 PM7:30 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: GOTO (Moon)
7:30 PM7:35 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Sudekum Planetarium (Moon)
7:35 PM8:05 PMEastern

Paper Presentations

7:35 PM7:50 PMEasternMelanie Isenbarger — Connecting Generations of Planetariums Through Data Storytelling
As a part of an independent study at Ball State, I am working to present nationwide planetarium statistics by state or U.S. territory in an ArcGIS StoryMap. Learn about the project and my journey with digital storytelling during my paper presentation.
7:50 PM8:05 PMEasternChrista Speights — How to do Interactive Virtual Star Parties Alone
The Dome Dialogue e-conferences promoted the benefits of keeping online planetarium shows interactive. Most of the tips for how to keep them interactive were for those with multiple planetarium employees. Haile Planetarium only has one full-time employee, and was not able to keep their part-time employees during the closure, so it seemed impossible to do interactive shows or star parties virtually. However, Haile Planetarium figured out how to do interactive virtual star parties. Their solution works for them, so Haile Planetarium will continue doing these virtual star parties until in-person outreach starts again.
8:05 PM10:00 PMEasternVisit the Virtual Hospitality Suite

Thursday, October 15, 2020

Start TimeEnd Time
11:00 AM11:05 AMEasternWelcome and chat / Check poster presentations
11:05 AM11:35 AMEastern

Paper Presentations

11:05 AM11:20 AMEasternDale W. Smith — Teaching Hybrid
I am teaching my classes in the Planetarium using BGSU’s hybrid mode combining a mixture of face-to-face and on-line elements. I will describe how these classes operate, contrast them with traditional formats, and explain my reasons for using this mode.
11:20 AM11:35 AMEasternSarah Komperud — Advancing Access for Everyone
The Whitney and Elizabeth MacMillan Planetarium is committed to creating an inclusive and accessible environment for everyone. We have worked with experts from other Minnesota cultural organizations and within the disability community to offer accommodations and programs for our audience members. Our efforts to make the planetarium inclusive and accessible include American Sign Language interpretation, Assistive Listening Devices, audio described programs, live captioning, sensory friendly programs, and size-inclusive seating. The Bell Museum is part of the Minnesota Access Alliance, which is raising the bar for accessibility across the culture and arts sectors in Minnesota.
11:35 AM11:40 AMEasternSponsor Presentation: Ash Enterprises (Moon)
11:40 AM12:10 PMEastern

Paper Presentations

11:40 AM11:55 AMEasternRaymond Zich — Addition of Computational Activities to a General Education Astronomy Course
I report on the introduction of spreadsheet based computational activities to a general education astronomy course and the results of this curriculum modification. Computation is an important tool in developing understanding of concepts and connecting science with prediction. Computation also introduces an active learning element. The computational exercises were implemented coincident with the presentation of associated topics. I reflect on the transition process and report on factors that led to the adoption of computational activities, factors that supported the change, and barriers faced while implementing this change. Surveys were used to investigate students’ learning, attitudes, and perceptions of the course.
11:55 AM12:10 PMEasternShannon Schmoll — Creating Inclusive Exhibits with Undergraduate Students
Abrams Planetarium collaborated with faculty running a course for freshman on race and gender in the sciences. The course was structured so the planetarium was a client of the students and they were to create inclusive exhibits for our lobby space. Funding was provided by Abrams Planetarium and the Lymann Briggs college at a total of $500 for the entire class for the exhibits to be be produced by the students. Exhibits were then installed in the lobby when appropriate. Exhibit design was done throughout the semester and addressed what students learned in the class through various assignments. The planetarium also provided feedback regarding what we needed, exhibit design, and instruction on women and people of color in astronomy. A study was also conducted with the students in the second semester which shows students increased their understanding around inclusion in STEM as well as positive impacts on their own STEM identities.
12:10 PM12:20 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Spitz (Earth)
12:20 PM12:45 PMEasternBreak / Lunch
12:45 PM1:30 PMEasternInvited Talk: Dr. Shannon Schmoll — Astronomy Update
1:30 PM1:35 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Seiler-Zeiss (Moon)
1:35 PM1:40 PMEasternBreak
1:40 PM2:10 PMEastern

Paper Presentations

1:40 PM1:55 PMEasternMike Smail — 5 Cities, 50 Years, 5000 Miles: The Remarkable Afterlife of America's First Planetarium Projector
Earlier this year, the Adler Planetarium re-acquired our original Zeiss planetarium projector, the first one in the Western Hemisphere. After its de-installation in 1970, the Adler's Zeiss Mark II/III criss-crossed America multiple times, before falling completely out of sight in the late 1980s. Where did it go? How did we track it down? And what is its future? I'll answer all those questions, and more, in this paper.
1:55 PM2:10 PMEasternShawn Laatsch — Utilizing IPS-SLOOH Partnership to provide stargazing in the time of COVID
Our astronomy center normally conducts telescopic stargazing following our Friday night public programs and has university astronomy labs Monday through Thursday evenings during the academic year. With COVID we are not able to open our observatory, but we have utilized the IPS-SLOOH Partnership to create an online astronomy club and conduct regular online star parties on Friday evenings since early July. In this paper I will share some of the lessons learned in our first few months, tips on how we are utilizing it for astronomy labs, and challenges we have encountered along the way.

Friday, October 16, 2020

Start TimeEnd Time
2:00 PM2:10 PMEasternWelcome and chat / Check poster presentations
2:10 PM3:40 PMEasternBusiness Meeting
3:40 PM3:50 PMEasternBreak
3:50 PM3:55 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: GOTO (Moon)
3:55 PM4:05 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: Seiler-Zeiss (Earth)
4:05 PM4:25 PMEasternAwards
4:25 PM4:30 PMEasternSponsor Presentation: AMNH (Moon)
4:30 PM4:50 PMEasternStorytelling
4:50 PM4:55 PMEasternPresident's Wrap-up